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Tho

noun
1.
A branch of the Tai languages.



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"Tho" Quotes from Famous Books



... you will receive with the other things. You ask me about Lord Tho[mon]d(66) and Will: all [the] party is so broke up at present that they are au desespoir. The Bedfords are in extraordinary good humour; that elevation of spirit does them no more credit than their ...
— George Selwyn: His Letters and His Life • E. S. Roscoe and Helen Clergue

... object we're now gathered here, So, brethren, sing: ERGO BIBAMUS! Tho' talk may be hushed, yet the glasses ring clear, Remember then, ERGO BIBAMUS! In truth 'tis an old, 'tis an excellent word, With its sound befitting each bosom is stirred, And an echo the festal hall filling is heard, A glorious ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... fight on!" Tho' his vessel was all but a wreck; And it chanced that, when half of the summer night was gone, With a grisly wound to be dressed, he had left the deck, But a bullet struck him that was dressing it suddenly dead, And himself he was wounded again, in the side and ...
— Public Speaking • Irvah Lester Winter

... if I could have leave from next Tuesday, as otherwise I shall not be able to attend the sales, and my Sam Browne is quite the dowdiest in tho ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, January 31, 1917 • Various

... to know pertiklar, them 'oles is two p'un' o' tebaccer wot I had sence I come aboard. Don't allow no Ol' Man t' do me in the bloomin' hye w'en it comes t' tottin' th' bill! ... I'll watch it! I keeps a good tally ov wot I gets, tho' I can't read nor write like them young 'know-alls' over there" (Martin had no love for 'brassbounders'), "them wot orter be aft in their proper place, an' not sittin' ...
— The Brassbounder - A Tale of the Sea • David W. Bone

... reach this point of vantage: and now, forth with it, that, wherever it may find you, I may assure your kindness that it would indeed have gratified me to see you, had circumstances enabled you to come my way; and that the amends you promise for failing to do so will be duly counted upon; tho' whether that will happen at Warwick Crescent is unlikely rather than merely uncertain—since the Bill which is to abolish my house, among many more notable erections, has 'passed the Lords'' a fortnight ...
— Philip Gilbert Hamerton • Philip Gilbert Hamerton et al

... few days everything succeeded so well that it began to bud, and throw out small leaves, which we hourly measured convinced (tho' now scarce a foot from the ground) it would soon afford us a refreshing shade. This unfortunate willow, by engrossing our whole time, rendered us incapable of application to any other study, and the cause of our inattention not being known, we were kept closer than before. ...
— The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau, Complete • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... the Humourist is excessively proud, and yet without knowing or suspecting it. For from the Liberty which he frankly allows to others, of rejecting his Opinion, he is fully persuaded, that he is free from all Pride; But tho' he acts in this Circumstance without over-bearing, it has already appear'd, not to be the Effect of his Humility, but of a different Motive; a Pleasure which he takes in observing the Extravagancies of others, rather than their Discretion. But to demonstrate his Pride, besides the ...
— An Essay towards Fixing the True Standards of Wit, Humour, Railery, Satire, and Ridicule (1744) • Corbyn Morris

... mone mandeth hire bleo, The lilie is lossom to seo, The fenyl ant the fille; Wowes this wilde drakes, Miles murgeth huere makes; Ase strem that striketh stille, Mody meneth; so doth mo (Ichot ycham on of tho) For loue that ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... here and try his luck somewhere else, but for the sake of his sister he hung on and on till he ran himself into debt over his ears—I can tell you. I, myself, could show a handful of his chits for meals and drinks in my drawer. I could never find out tho' where he found all the money at last. Can't be but he must have got something out of that brother of his, a coal merchant in Port Said. Anyhow he paid everybody before he left, but the girl nearly broke her heart. Disappointment, of course, and at her age, don't you know.... Mrs. Schomberg ...
— Falk • Joseph Conrad

... and the reverend Commissioners of Scotland, I am sorry I have given offence in the delivery thereof. And for the printing, although I have an order, I will forbear, except I be further commanded.—THO. COLEMAN." ...
— The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Gillespie

... 'Spectator', No. 121 (July 19, 1711): 'A modern Philosopher, quoted by Monsieur 'Bale' in his Learned Dissertation on the Souls of Brutes delivers the same Opinion [i.e.—That Instinct is the immediate direction of Providence], tho' in a bolder form of words where he says 'Deus est Anima Brutorum', God himself is the Soul of Brutes.' There is much in 'Monsieur Bayle' on this theme. Probably Addison had in mind the following passage of ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith • Oliver Goldsmith

... justly claim our praise, Crown'd by Mack-Fleckno[3] with immortal bays; Tho' prais'd and punish'd once for other's[4] rhimes, His own deserve as great applause sometimes; Yet Pegasus[5], of late, has born dead weight, Rid by ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 70, March 1, 1851 • Various

... feels obliged to defend herself from "that Aspersion which some of my own Sex have been unkind enough to throw upon me, that I seem to endeavour to divert more than to improve the Minds of my Readers. Now, as I take it, the Aim of every Person, who pretends to write (tho' in the most insignificant and ludicrous way) ought to tend at least to a good Moral Use; I shou'd be sorry to have my Intentions judg'd to be the very reverse of what they are in reality. How far I have been able to succeed ...
— The Life and Romances of Mrs. Eliza Haywood • George Frisbie Whicher

... bound, Master Prosper?" demanded Captain Jo. "For 'tis ill biding for orders after cracking on to be punctual; and tho' I say naught against the anchorage as an anchorage, the wind, what with these hills and gullies, is like Mulligan's blanket, always coming and going; and by fits an' starts as the ague took the goose; and likewise backwards and forwards, like Boscastle fair: so that our cables ...
— Sir John Constantine • Prosper Paleologus Constantine

... Tho' they were strong and he was weak, He wouldn't his Lord deny. His life lay in their cruel hands, But ...
— Poems • Frances E. W. Harper

... you'll all have my digestion, Why yearn for plays, to pose as Brutuses or Catos in, When you may get a garden to grow the best potatoes in? You see that at my age by Nature's shocks unharmed I am! Tho' if I sneeze but thrice, good heavens, how alarmed I am! But act your parts like men, and tho' you all great sinners are, You're sure to act like ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. XXXI, No. 3, July 1908. • Various

... my only luve, And fare the weel a while! And I will come again, my luve, Tho' it were ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... Could any cross, could any plague be worse? Could heaven or hell, did both conspire in one To afflict my soul, invent a greater scourge Then presently I am tormented with? Ah, Mariana, cause of my lament, Joy of my heart, and comfort of my life! For tho I breath my sorrows in the air And tire my self, or silently I sigh, My sorrows afficts my soul ...
— Fair Em - A Pleasant Commodie Of Faire Em The Millers Daughter Of - Manchester With The Love Of William The Conquerour • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... tho' in dust thy relics lie, Thy virtues, Mano, ne'er shall die; Tho' Nile's full stream be seen no more, That spread his waves from shore to shore, Still in the verdure of the plain His ...
— Oriental Literature - The Literature of Arabia • Anonymous

... travelled on the continent, becoming familiar with modern languages and men, and returned to England in 1645, to recruit for Abingdon for the parliament Wood states that Neville "was very great with Harry Marten, Tho. Chaloner, Tho. Scot, Jam. Harrington and other zealous commonwealths men." His association with them probably arose from his membership of the council of state (1651), and also from his agreement with them in their suspicions of Cromwell, who, in his opinion, "gaped after ...
— The Isle Of Pines (1668) - and, An Essay in Bibliography by W. C. Ford • Henry Neville

... check your swift conclusion, What you say can scarce be so, For I know that this one's living That I saw two hours ago. Old and gray, and slightly stooping, Black as ebony in hue, He's a type of times departed, Tho' he still ...
— The American Missionary — Vol. 48, No. 10, October, 1894 • Various

... faster tears did fall, As she moaned, "I've nothing to give at all." Ah, wicked indeed he looked; But while she sighed, he smiled! "Promise, when you are queen," he said, "To give me your first-born child!" Little she tho't what that might mean, Or if ever in truth she should be queen Anything, so that the work was done— Anything, so that the gold was spun! She promised all that he chose to ask; And blithely he began ...
— On the Tree Top • Clara Doty Bates

... And tho' our paths be separate, And thy way be not mine, Yet coming to the mercy-seat, My soul will meet with thine; And "God keep watch 'tween thee and me," I'll whisper there; He blesseth thee, he blesseth me, ...
— My Three Days in Gilead • Elmer Ulysses Hoenshal

... life," he said in conclusion; but though he said this he chuckled, and seemed to enjoy himself immensely. "Now then," he added, "there's no doubt at all as ye're hinnercent. I know that as clear—I feels as sartin on that p'int—as tho' I wor reading the secrets of my own heart. But 'tis jest equal sartin as a magistrate 'ud bring you hin guilty. He'd say—and think hisself mighty wise, too—'You had the locket, so in course yer tuk the locket, and so yer must be punished.' Then you'd be tuk from the lock-up to ...
— Sue, A Little Heroine • L. T. Meade

... exhibited plays (that were so filthy both in actors and the action) without any offense of honesty. But, first, I would make a little inquiry, seeing you can not show such estates to be anyway happy, as are in continual wars, being still in terror, trouble, and guilt of shedding human blood, tho it be their foes; what reason then or what wisdom shall any man show in glorying in the largeness of empire, all their joy being but as a glass, bright and brittle, and evermore in fear and danger of breaking? To dive the deeper into this matter, ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VII (of X)—Continental Europe I • Various

... about that, myself," returned the soldier, slightly raising his cap and scratching his crown, as if in recollection of some narrowly escaped danger. "I reckon, tho', when I see them slope up like a covey of red-legged pattridges, my heart was in my mouth, for I looked for nothin' else but that same operation: but I wur just as well pleased, when, after talkin' their gibberish, ...
— Hardscrabble - The Fall of Chicago: A Tale of Indian Warfare • John Richardson

... the daddy uv a gal, and begin to feel my keepin' mitely—I'd rather it was a boy tho', thinks I, fur then he'd feel neerur to me, as how he'd bare my name and there be less chance fur the Sporums to run out, but considerin' everything, a gal will do mi'ty well. Jist then the ole nuss pokes her head ...
— The Book of Anecdotes and Budget of Fun; • Various

... grew softer as I questioned—calm With mystery that like an answer moved, And from infinity there fell a balm, The old peace that God is, tho all unproved. The old faith that tho gulfs sidereal stun The soul, and knowledge drown within their deep, There is no world that wanders, no not one Of all the millions, ...
— Many Gods • Cale Young Rice

... Tho' blinding tempests drove his ships astray, And on the decks conspiring Spaniards grew More mutinous and dangerous, day by day, Than did the deadly winds that round him blew, Yet the bluff captain, with his bearded lip, His lordly purpose, and his high disdain, Stood like ...
— Christopher Columbus and His Monument Columbia • Various

... only Luve, And fare thee weel a while! And I will come again, my Luve, Tho' it were ...
— The Captives • Hugh Walpole

... mean to wound me, I know his heart is kind. Alas! that man can love us And be so blind, so blind. A little time for pleasure, A little time for play; A word to prove the life of love And frighten Care away! Tho' poor my lot in some small cot That were ...
— The Kingdom of Love - and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crossed ...
— Composition-Rhetoric • Stratton D. Brooks

... ha'n't been home to chore-time in the last three days, and my wife is gittin' worked up abaout it. Here we've bin a-settin' and a-talkin' night arter night, and arternoon arter arternoon for more 'n a week, and 'pears to me it 's abaout time as tho' somethin' o' ruther ought to be done. There's nobody got nothin' agin the Doctor that I've heerd of. He's a smart old gentleman, and he's a clever old gentleman, and he preaches what I call good, stiff doctrine; but we don't feel much like payin' for light work ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... it thy dear image be Which fills thus my bosom with woe? Can aught bear resemblance to thee Which grief and not joy can bestow? This counterfeit snatch from my heart, Ye pow'rs, tho' with torment I rave, Tho' mortal will prove the fell smart: I then shall find ...
— Joseph Andrews Vol. 1 • Henry Fielding

... to ask if you were smiling," said Rose, "but you look so stern—oh, I don't care if you scold him some, but 'tho he was mean, and naughty, don't make ...
— Princess Polly's Playmates • Amy Brooks

... West is West, and never the twain shall meet Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat. But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, tho' they come from the ends ...
— "Over There" with the Australians • R. Hugh Knyvett

... down and prayed, instead of crossing themselves. Finally, they contributed nothing to the support of religious fraternities or to the rebuilding of churches, reserving their means for the relief of tho poor and afflicted.[474] ...
— The Rise of the Hugenots, Vol. 1 (of 2) • Henry Martyn Baird

... Julian. "Is thy Cup so full Of bitterness—thy Hope—thy heart so dull That thou shouldst from Thee dash the Draught of Life, So late escaped the elemental strife! Rise—tho' these shores few aids to Life supply, Look upon me, and know thou shalt not die. Thou gazest in mute wonder—more may be Thy marvel when thou knowest mine and me. But come—The bark that bears us hence shall find Her Haven, soon, ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... advance guard, and thar's a bigger body behint. We shell soon see, as they're ridin' deerect this way. By the 'Tarnal, 'twon't do to let 'em sight us; leastwise, not till we've seen more o' them, an' know what sort they air. White men tho' they call themselves, I'd a'most as soon meet Injuns. They'd be sure to take us for Texans; and 'bout me there'd be no mistake in that. But they'd treet you the same, an' thar treetment ain't like to be civil. ...
— The Lone Ranche • Captain Mayne Reid

... very Dear Sir, with a great deal of pleasure, your agreeable letter of ye 24th of January, but was very sorry to hear that you are inlisted in the numerous troup of gouty people. Tho' I have myself the honour of being of that tribe I dont desire my friends should enter into the same corporation. I am particularly griev'd to see you among the invalids for you have, more than any other, occasion ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... woman; one in whom The spring-time of her childish years Hath never lost its fresh perfume Tho' knowing well that life hath room For many blights and ...
— Honor Edgeworth • Vera

... rabbits wid dogs. Now and den, a crowd of Niggers would jump a rabbit when no dogs was 'round. Dey would tho' rocks at him and run him in a hollow log. Den dey would twiss him out wid hickory wisps (withes). Sometimes dere warn't no fur left on de rabbit time dey got him twisted out, but dat was all right. Dey jus' slapped him over daid and tuk ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... knowest our down-lying and rising-up, thou art acquainted with all our ways, and knowest our tho'ts afar off." ...
— From Boyhood to Manhood • William M. Thayer

... when to the trembling string, The dance gaed thro' the lighted ha', To thee my fancy took its wing, I sat, but neither heard nor saw: Tho' this was fair, and that was braw, And yon the toast of a' the town, I sigh'd, and said amang them a', "Ye are na ...
— Robert Burns • Principal Shairp

... mild, yet somewhat overcast by tho mists which announce coming winter in London, and Helen walked musingly beneath the trees that surrounded the garden of Lord Lansmere's house. Many leaves were yet left on the boughs; but they were sere and withered. And the birds chirped ...
— The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II • Various

... tho' dead leaves be lying In mournful clusters 'neath your journeying feet, Tho' wintry winds through naked boughs are sighing, The flowers are dead, yet is their memory sweet Of summer winds and countless roses glowing 'Neath the warm kisses of the generous sun. Hope on, hope ever, why should ...
— The Life of Duty, v. 2 - A year's plain sermons on the Gospels or Epistles • H. J. Wilmot-Buxton

... at this stage of his discovery Volta was inclined to attribute tho origin of the current to the contact between the metals and his moist "conductors of the second class," though later in the same article he says it is impossible to tell whether the impulse which sets ...
— Popular Science Monthly Volume 86

... and great thy fame; Far kend and noted is thy name: An' tho' yon lowin' heugh's thy hame, Thou travels far; An' faith! thou's neither lag nor ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... visited by Angel-pow'rs, With golden crowns and wreaths of heav'nly flow'rs; Hear and believe! thy own importance know, 35 Nor bound thy narrow views to things below. Some secret truths, from learned pride conceal'd, To Maids alone and Children are reveal'd: What tho' no credit doubting Wits may give? The Fair and Innocent shall still believe. 40 Know, then, unnumber'd Spirits round thee fly, The light Militia of the lower sky: These, tho' unseen, are ever on the wing, Hang o'er ...
— The Rape of the Lock and Other Poems • Alexander Pope

... this, tho!" cried Smallbones. "I'll not trust him— Jemm, my boy, get up a pig of ballast, I'll sink him fifty fathoms deep, and then if so be he cum up again, why, then I give it ...
— Snarley-yow - or The Dog Fiend • Frederick Marryat

... by thine heavenly aid, I laid me down and slept secure; Not death should make my heart afraid, Tho' I should wake ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... like suit, one of brilliancy rather than feeling or self-sacrifice. By a Heart, if high, of affection more than is thought; if low, beautiful. By a Club, a Woman executive; of some audacity; restless or self-depending: admiring intellect of solid kind tho' maybe lacking it. By a Spade, a Woman not devoted to benefiting others; and threatened by misfortune; ...
— The Square of Sevens - An Authoritative Method of Cartomancy with a Prefatory Note • E. Irenaeus Stevenson

... I ever say, A pirate's be for I; Hap what hap may he's allus gay And drinks an' bungs his eye. For his work he's never loath; An' a-pleasurin' he will go; Tho' sartin sure to be popt off, Yo ho, ...
— Humphrey Bold - A Story of the Times of Benbow • Herbert Strang

... "which accompanied your Bro- "therly Address of the 23d of "Jany last, tho' elegant in "themselves, were rendered "more valuable by the flattering "sentiments, and affectionate "manner, in which they ...
— Washington's Masonic Correspondence - As Found among the Washington Papers in the Library of Congress • Julius F. Sachse

... Michael Cresap marching at the head of a formidable company of upwards of one hundred and thirty men from the mountains and backwoods; painted like Indians; armed with tomahawks and rifles; dressed in hunting shirts and moccasins; and, tho' some of them had travelled hundreds of miles from the banks of the Ohio, they seemed to walk light and easy, and not with less spirit than at the first hour of ...
— American Prisoners of the Revolution • Danske Dandridge

... from a contribution made to Read's Weekly Journal, of Saturday, January 9, 1731, by Mr. Thomas North, who thus describes the Christmas entertainment and good cheer he met with in London at the house of a friend: "It was the house of an eminent and worthy merchant, and tho', sir, I have been accustomed in my own country to what may very well be called good housekeeping, yet I assure you I should have taken this dinner to have been provided for a whole parish, rather than for about a dozen gentlemen: 'Tis impossible for me to give you half our bill of fare, so ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Someone had blunder'd. Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die. Into the valley of Death Rode ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... it," he repeated, emphatically. "You may be surprised at it, but then you haven't gone through the experience I've had of her. I can tell you, it was something to remember. Of course, I got off scot free myself—as you can see. She did her best to break up my pluck for me tho'. She jolly near drove as fine a fellow as ever lived into a madhouse. What ...
— A Set of Six • Joseph Conrad

... And tho' we do not pretend to any Discoveries in this Book, especially at this time of Day, when all parts of Learning are cultivated with so much Exactness; yet we hope that it will not be altogether unacceptable to the curious Reader to know what the state of Learning was among the Arabs, five hundred ...
— The Improvement of Human Reason - Exhibited in the Life of Hai Ebn Yokdhan • Ibn Tufail

... possible that the singular instinct of tho southern puma, which is unique among animals in a state of nature, is not possessed by the entire species, ranging as it does over a hundred degrees of latitude, from British North America to Tierra del Fuego. The widely different ...
— The Naturalist in La Plata • W. H. Hudson

... tarriest here too long, And art perhaps repining at the days Of nine continued victories, o'er men Dear to thy soul, tho' reprobate and base. Away! ...
— Count Julian • Walter Savage Landor

... a very curious menage that of the Forresters'. They were wonderfully happy, yet you could not call theirs domestic felicity. They went out perpetually every where, and were scarcely ever alone together at home. Tho cold-water cure of matrimony had not been able to cool either down into the dignity and steadiness befitting that honorable state. As far as I could see, Charley flirted as much as ever; the only difference was, that he stole upon his victims ...
— Guy Livingstone; - or, 'Thorough' • George A. Lawrence

... cold; yet knowing what had but so lately happened, and having the fears of Maister Wiggie before my eyes, I had made a solemn vow within myself, not to taste liquor for six months at least; nor would I here break my word, tho' much made a fool of by an Englisher, and a fou Eirisher, who sang all the road; contenting myself, in the best way I could, with a tumbler of strong beer and ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - tailor in Dalkeith • D. M. Moir

... many other things, he was troubled by the thieving propensities of the slaves. September tenth of this year he records that because of the scarcity of apples and the depredations that were being committed "every Night upon the few I have, I found it necessary (tho much too early) to gather and put them up ...
— George Washington: Farmer • Paul Leland Haworth

... fate, when we're decreed to 't? The graceless brethren paid small heed to 't. A brace they were of sturdy fellows, As we may say, that fear'd no colours, And sneer'd with modern infidelity At the old gipsy's fond credulity. It proved all true tho', as she'd mumbled— For on a day the varlets stumbled On a green spot—sit linguae fides— 'Tis Suidas tells it—where Alcides Secure, as fearing no ill neighbour, Lay fast asleep after a "Labour." His trusty oaken plant was near— The ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb IV - Poems and Plays • Charles and Mary Lamb

... tell't me how you stood up and saluted him, and I was glad I'd kissed ye ance upon a time, though it was only to plague ye. Remember what I tell't ye about these Highland boddys. M. is like all the rest of 'em, and moreover the Prince made ye his aide-de-camp, and it was to have been him, tho' he didna mind at the first because it left him free to be courting his leddy, but noo he'll hae it rankling in his heart like poison. And keep your eye on that chiel, Donald. He's foster-brother to M., and wad stick his dirk in the Prince himself if M. ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... I could hear more of Lord D. to qualify him for his high office, than merely that he is a GOOD Man. Goodness I confess is an essential, tho too rare a Qualification of a Minister of State. Possibly I may not have been informd of the whole of his Lordships Character. Without a Greatness of Mind adequate to the Importance of his Station, I fear he may find himself embarrassd with ...
— The Writings of Samuel Adams, vol. III. • Samuel Adams

... such vague puerilities collected into one short paragraph? This is pure impertinence, and Phil. deserves to be privately reprimanded for quoting such windy chaff without noting and protesting it as colloquial. But what I wish the reader to mark—the [Greek: tho hepimhythion]—is, that suppose the two Scaligers amongst the Christian Fathers engaged in fixing the canon: greater learning you cannot have; neither was there, to a dead certainty, one tenth part as much amongst the canon-settlers. Yet all this ...
— The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. 1 (2 vols) • Thomas De Quincey

... right on the spot, before you, and you can advise sonny, here. You see Lem has got his taxes to pay,—they're small, of course, but they're an expense,—and he'd ought to carry a little insurance on his buildings, tho' he ain't had any up to now. On the other hand, if he can get a tenant that'll put on a few shingles and clapboards now and then, or a coat o' paint 'n' a roll o' wall paper, his premises won't go to rack 'n' ruin same's they're in danger o' doin' at the present ...
— Mother Carey's Chickens • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... they removed to Wales, where, on an old family estate belonging to Mrs. Piozzi, they built a house, and christened the place with the queer Welsh-Italian compound name of Brynbella. "Mr. Piozzi built the house for me, he said; my own old chateau, Bachygraig by name, tho' very curious, was wholly uninhabitable; and we called the Italian villa he set up as mine in the Vale of Cluid, North Wales, Brynbella, or the beautiful brow, making the name half Welsh and half Italian, as we were." Here they ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 7, No. 43, May, 1861 • Various

... Signior Rigep Dandulo, the onely son of a silk merchant in the isle of Tsio, from the delusions of that great Impostor Mahomet, unto the Christian Religion; and of his admission unto Baptism, by Mr. Gunning at Excester-house Chappel, the 8th of November, 1657. Drawn up by Tho. Warmstry, D.D., Lond. 1658." ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 58, December 7, 1850 • Various

... When death clasps her in turn! e'en in the grave Nursing the precious head she could not save, Tho' through each drop her life-blood yearn'd to flow If but for him she might to scaffold go:— And O! as from that Hall, with innocent gore Sacred from roof to floor, To that grim other place of blood he went— What cry of agony rent The twilight,—cry as of an Angel's pain,— My ...
— The Visions of England - Lyrics on leading men and events in English History • Francis T. Palgrave

... the whole art and mystery could be learned in two or three weeks, or months at farthest, as I had frequently met with persons who professed a knowledge of the business, which they had acquired in two or three months, and tho' those men were esteemed distillers, and in possession of all the necessary art, in this very abstruse science; I soon found them to be ignorant blockheads, without natural genius, ...
— The Practical Distiller • Samuel McHarry

... a walk in the street, the tourist, even tho his visit be not the first, will note the ancient look of things. Here are buildings that have survived for two, or even five, hundred years, and yet they are still found fit for the purposes to which they are put. Few buildings are tall, the "skyscraper" being undiscoverable. On great and ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume I. - Great Britain and Ireland • Various

... Dear Swift, those spotless leaves I send; Small is the present, but sincere the friend. Think not so poor a book below thy care; Who knows the price that thou canst make it bear? Tho' tawdry now, and like Tyralla's face, The spacious front shines out with borrow'd grace; Tho' pasteboards, glitt'ring like a tinsell'd coat, A rasa tabula within denote; Yet if a venal and corrupted age, And modern vices should provoke thy rage; If, warn'd once more by their ...
— Irish Wit and Humor - Anecdote Biography of Swift, Curran, O'Leary and O'Connell • Anonymous

... Leastways left the red men, that he knew, 'N' come to look for folks like me an' you;— Goldarned white folks that he never saw. Queerest thing was—though he loved a squaw, 'T was on her account he planned escape; Shook the Apaches, an' took up red tape With the U. S. gov'ment arter a while; Tho' they do say gov'ment may be vile, Mean an' treacherous an' deceivin'. Well, I ain't sayin' our gov'ment ...
— Dreams and Days: Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... likeness could there be? My brother's hair Is as a prince's and a rover's, strong With sunlight and with strife: not like the long Locks that a woman combs.... And many a head Hath this same semblance, wing for wing, tho' bred Of blood not ours.... 'Tis hopeless. ...
— The Electra of Euripides • Euripides

... The ploughman, tho' he labour hard, Yet on the holy-day Heigh trolollie lollie foe, etc. No emperor so merrily Does pass his time away: Then care ...
— The Complete Angler • Izaak Walton

... the apostles and primitive times did so much and so long pray for, tho' never long with much quietness enjoyed; that which our fathers in these latter times have fasted, prayed and mourned after, yet attained not; even the cause which many dear saints now with God, have furthered by extremest sufferings, poverty, imprisonment, ...
— The Covenants And The Covenanters - Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation • Various

... she be. I don't want none to tell me that, squoire. Tho', squoire, it's better to me nor a ten pun' note to hear you say so. I allays had a leaning to you, squoire; but I'll more nor lean to you, now. I've said all through she was good, and if e'er a man in Bungay said she warn't—; well, I was there ...
— The Way We Live Now • Anthony Trollope

... threatened to be called to a public account for this freedom; and the publisher of this has been newspapered into gaol already for it; tho' I see nothing in it for which the government can be displeased; yet if at the same time those people who with an unlimited arrogance in print, every day affront the king, prescribe the parliament, and lampoon the government, may be either ...
— The True-Born Englishman - A Satire • Daniel Defoe

... hisself," said Hayseed. "Some folks, yer know, hez ter live ter set 'emselves right, but this one 'bleeged ter die. He was allers goin' on erbout his bein' out o' health, an' nobody believed him, so he was 'bleeged ter die. Mrs. Seymour's young woman was tellin' me she tho't he died to spite folks that wouldn't 'low he was sick. She said he was ...
— The Gentle Art of Cooking Wives • Elizabeth Strong Worthington

... '"Tho' gold could not buy me, sweet words could deceive me; So faithful and lonely till death I must roam." "Oh, Mary, sweet Mary, look up and forgive me, With wealth and with glory your true love ...
— Yeast: A Problem • Charles Kingsley

... nuffin 'bout dat," said Hagar, making a vigorous clatter among her dishes; "'spects the day's comin', tho', when de Lord gets ready fur't. 'Tain't ...
— Culm Rock - The Story of a Year: What it Brought and What it Taught • Glance Gaylord

... leg yet and how is the owl man and is he still playin hang with the texes. Theer is a big chap heer that is strait like him he hath swallowed the owl Book and cant help bring it up agen but dear Kirry no more at present i axpect to be Home sune bogh, to see u all tho I dont no azactly With luv your luving ...
— The Manxman - A Novel - 1895 • Hall Caine

... matter—'tis a comfort, though, To know he will take one, And even tho' Bess and Bella go, He still may fix on Fan. I'll have him in the family, That's sure—But, why, you look— "Oh, madam, Mr. Thomson's just Got married to ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19, Issue 545, May 5, 1832 • Various

... where children dwell, Earth's fairest mem'ry and its Palestine; Tho' years have passed since on my forehead there Were graven lines of weariness and care, Still on the silver string of memory oft I tell The golden beads of joy ...
— Across the Sea and Other Poems. • Thomas S. Chard

... while on the subjeck of Injuns, that they are in the main a very shaky set, with even less sense than the Fenians, and when I hear philanthropists bewailin the fack that every year "carries the noble red man nearer the settin sun," I simply have to say I'm glad of it, tho' it is rough on the settin sun. They call you by the sweet name of Brother one minit, and the next they scalp you with their Thomas-hawks. But I wander. Let us return to ...
— Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature • Various

... much circumspection, the druggist made answer as follows "What you say, good neighbour, is certainly true, and my plan is Always to think of improvement, provided tho' new, 'tis not costly. But what avails it in truth, unless one has plenty of money, Active and fussy to he, improving both inside and outside? Sadly confined are the means of a burgher; e'en when he knows it, Little that's good he is able to do, his ...
— The Poems of Goethe • Goethe

... tho' 'tis so long, it is not very wide, For two are the most that together can ride; And e'en then, 'tis a chance but they get in a pother, And jostle and cross and run foul of ...
— The Life of Thomas Telford by Smiles • Samuel Smiles

... I seye, and telle me what she is Anon, that I may gone aboute thi nede: Know iche hire ought? for my love telle me this; Thanne wolde I hopen the rather for to spede.' Tho gan the veyne of Troilus to blede, For he was hit, and wex alle rede for schame; 'Aha!' quod ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... it is to pause, to make an end, To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use! As tho' to breathe ...
— Theodore Roosevelt • Edmund Lester Pearson

... the flight, on his red roan steed of might; And the bride lay on his arm, still, as tho' she feared no harm, Smiling out into the night. "Fearest thou?" he said at last. "Nay," she answered him in haste, "Not such death as we could find; only life with one behind, Ride ...
— Border and Bastille • George A. Lawrence

... in the young man's face, and scenting a sharp bargain, he said, "Why, then, you would have to begin at tho very beginning, and learn the name of ...
— Barriers Burned Away • E. P. Roe

... disposed to turn their heads from that draught, which I thought they would not long relish. Lord D. with the generosity and charity he always indulged, bids them welcome, disposed as he says to favour even the independant Whigs of America, above any other nation under heaven, for tho' no longer brethren, they are at least our cousins, branches from ...
— Picturesque Quebec • James MacPherson Le Moine

... the second expedition, Washington commanding tho Virginia troops. The general lost so much time in building roads that, in November, he was fifty miles from the fort. A council of war decided to give up the attempt. But Washington receiving news of the weakness of the French garrison, ...
— A Brief History of the United States • Barnes & Co.

... to sleep, my darling boy, Thy father's dead, thy mother lonely, Of late thou wert his pride, his joy, But now thou hast not one to own thee. The cold wide world before us lies, But oh! such heartless things live in it, It makes me weep—then close thine eyes Tho' it be but for ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 262, July 7, 1827 • Various

... wavered, and I tentatively inferred that she would soon perfectly reconsider her not altogether unobvious course. Furiously, tho' with a tender, ebbing similitude, across her mental consciousness stole a reculmination of all the truths she had ever known concerning, or even remotely relating to, the not easily fathomed qualities of paste and ink. So she stood, focused in an intensity ...
— The Re-echo Club • Carolyn Wells

... civil fury first grew high, And men fell out, they knew not why; When hard words, jealousies, and fears Set folks together by the ears, And made them fight, like mad or drunk, For dame Religion as for Punk, Whose honesty they all durst swear for, Tho' not a man of them knew wherefore; When Gospel-Trumpeter, surrounded With long-ear'd rout, to battle sounded, And pulpit, drum ecclesiastick, Was beat with fist, instead of a stick; Then did Sir Knight abandon dwelling, ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... I feel as I have felt—or be what I have been, Or weep as I could once have wept, o'er many a vanished scene; {252} As springs in deserts found seem sweet, all brackish tho' they be, So, midst the withered waste of life, those tears would ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... Whose thoughts are brutish:—seen by few, The few have therefore light divine Their visions are God's legions!—sign, I give you; for we stand alone, And you are frozen to the bone. Your palsied hands refuse their swords. A sharper edge is in my words, A deadlier wound is in my cry. Yea, tho' you slay us, do we die? In forcing us to bear the worst, You made of us Immortals first. Away! and trouble not ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... of hunting toggery suspended in his right hand as he paused, before going upstairs, to deliver his opinions with characteristic weight and vivacity to the stud-groom, "he is uncommon particular about 'em; and if his leathers aint as white as snow he'll never touch 'em, tho' as soon as the pack come nigh him at Royallieu, the leathers might just as well never have been cleaned, them hounds jump about him so; old Champion's at his saddle before you can say Davy Jones. Tops are trials, I aint denying that, specially when you've ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... book started simply as an improvement upon the English original. Even in externals there is a similarity. The early editions of Webster had a dim, hacked-out engraving on wood of Noah Webster, Jr., Esq., to correspond with the scarcely more refined portrait of Tho. Dilworth which prefaces the "New Guide." Both books have long lists of words, proceeding from the simplest combination to words of five syllables, and even in Dilworth to proper names of six syllables, containing such retired words as ...
— Noah Webster - American Men of Letters • Horace E. Scudder

... to see distress, It tells a tale they dread to know, And guilt, tho' thron'd in mightiness, In every victim sees ...
— The Loyalists, Vol. 1-3 - An Historical Novel • Jane West

... all the circumstances of the case personally and intimately, have written and published in full detail in my widely circulated work "Modern American Spiritualism."—But this work consists of 560 pages, and tho' bought by thousands of American Spiritualists, I should not know in England where to turn to find a copy except in my ...
— Hydesville - The Story of the Rochester Knockings, Which Proclaimed the Advent of Modern Spiritualism • Thomas Olman Todd

... tho most of its towers have perished long ago, helps us to imagine faintly what Italian towns were like in the days of Frederick Barbarossa or his grandson Frederick II. For most of the houses were actually towers, long rectangular columns, vying with each other in height ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Vol VIII - Italy and Greece, Part Two • Various

... resolution of the House of Representatives, founded on an act of Congress, to propose to the British Government an expedient which should be free from that objection and more effectual for the object, by making it piratical. In that mode the enormity of tho crime would place the offenders out of the protection of their Government, and involve no question of search or other question between the parties touching their respective rights. It was believed, also, that it would completely ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 1 (of 3) of Volume 2: James Monroe • James D. Richardson

... The knights to whom he referred the matter as a subject of enquiry, gave it nevertheless as their opinion that De Walton was void of all censure, having discharged his duty in its fullest extent, till the commands of his superior officer obliged him to surrender tho Dangerous Castle. ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... pittied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each houre One thing or other: when thou didst not (Sauage) Know thine owne meaning; but wouldst gabble, like A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes With words that made them knowne: But thy vild race (Tho thou didst learn) had that in't, which good natures Could not abide to be with; therefore wast thou Deseruedly confin'd into this Rocke, who hadst Deseru'd ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... ye birds I am wide awake Tho' silent 'mid your tender harmony; And yet I would fain join your sweet concert, Whilst upon the face of fair Bianca, 'Mirror of ...
— The Tragedies of the Medici • Edgcumbe Staley

... shout was that which pierc'd the skies! It seem'd as tho' all Nature's beings join'd, To hail ...
— The Prince of Parthia - A Tragedy • Thomas Godfrey

... spent a month of entire delight there some eight years ago, and tho' nothing I have since seen has effaced the impressions of my visit, yet your fresher feelings bring out whatever looks faint or dubious in them, as a gentle sponging might revive the gone glory of some old picture. (You must know I have seen an exquisite copy ...
— From the Easy Chair, vol. 1 • George William Curtis

... River about six miles southwest of present Springfield, Ohio. His mother may have been a Creek or Cherokee woman, who had come up from the South with some of the Shawnees. The Shawnees were a Southern people, once. The mother's name was Me-tho-a-tas-ke. ...
— Boys' Book of Indian Warriors - and Heroic Indian Women • Edwin L. Sabin

... least we'll keep Thee All the time we may; But Thy grace and blessing We will keep alway. When our hearts Thou leavest Worthless tho' they be, Give them to Thy Mother ...
— The St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choir Book • Various

... followed the battle was a sad one. Through the darkness, and under a fast-falling rain, the hours were spent in searching for our wounded comrades amidst the heap of slain upon the field; and tho glimmering of the lanterns, as they flickered far and near across the wide plain, bespoke the track of the fatigue parties in their mournful round; while the groans of the wounded rose amidst the silence with an accent of ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 1 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... of his neighbours' boates, oares, or canoas w^{th}out leave from the owner shalbe held[357] and esteemed as a felon and so proceeded againste;[358] tho[359] hee that shall take away by violence or stelth any canoas or other thinges from the Indians shall make valuable restitution to the said Indians, and shall forfaict, if he be a freeholder, five pound; if a servant, 40^s, ...
— Colonial Records of Virginia • Various

... my fust wife thatty-three years ago. She left me with six bors and Susan. She was the owdest of them all, tarned sixteen when her mother died. She was a fine jolly gal, with lots of sperit. I coon't be alluz at home, and tho' I'd nivver a wadd {52c} to saa aginst Susan, yet I thowt I wanted some one to look arter her and the bors. Gals want a mother more than bors. So arter a year I married my second wife, and a rale good wife she ha' bin to me. But Susan coon't git on with her. She'd dew {52d} what she ...
— Two Suffolk Friends • Francis Hindes Groome

... with the baby in her arms ran down the door steps and into the carriage Mr. Hose doing the same. "It's a good thing its a nice day isn't it Charlie?" she said to her husband "Yes it is a good job or the baby couldn't have come out tho'. He isn't so very delicate, by the bye what's his name ...
— Daisy Ashford: Her Book • Daisy Ashford

... that the empire of this gret Chane is devyded in 12 provynces; and every provynce hathe mo than 2000 cytees; and of townes with outen nombre. This contree is fulle gret. For it hathe 12 pryncypalle kynges, in 12 provynces. And every of tho kynges han many kynges undre hem; and alle thei ben obeyssant to the gret Chane. And his lond and his lordschipe durethe so ferre that a man may not gon from on hed to another, nouther be see ne ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 9 - Asia, Part 2 • Richard Hakluyt

... seems too high, Shall I play the fool and die? Those that bear a noble mind, Where they want, of riches find. Think what with them they would do Who without them dare to woo: And unless that mind I see, What care I tho' great ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... yo' well, tho' yo' don't know me. I was up at the 'all to-night, and yo' did make me so laugh that I wouldna' see yo' in the streets for nothing. Neaw, let it be yea or ...
— A Mummer's Wife • George Moore

... be a burden on the family I was eager to work. Too weak for farm duties, I helped about the house and came, in course of time, to earn a good word from grannie. Tho of the same age, there was a great difference between Allan and myself. He could lift weights I could not move, did not get tired as I did, and as the stronger took care of me We were all happy and getting-on well when trouble came ...
— The Narrative of Gordon Sellar Who Emigrated to Canada in 1825 • Gordon Sellar

... and were invented very ingeniously by our Ancients, though our Moderns mostly know not the reason thereof. Each hath its simple Character, because the Sound which they signifie, is only one, tho' mixt; for a. o. and u. are so pronounced, that the passage of the Voice, the Tongue and Teeth being conjoyned for to pronounce, e. becomes Straiter, and so e. together with the said Letters, a. o. u. doth constitute but one only, yet ...
— The Talking Deaf Man - A Method Proposed, Whereby He Who is Born Deaf, May Learn to Speak, 1692 • John Conrade Amman

... prostitute, And take the Alcaeick lute, Or thine own Horace, or Anacreon's lyre; Warm thee by Pindar's fire; And, tho' thy nerves be shrunk, and blood be cold, Ere years have made thee old, Strike that disdainful heat Throughout, to their defeat; As curious fools, and envious of thy strain, May, blushing, swear no ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... carpet-rags to sew, and I want 'em done by the time Miss Jane gits her loom empty, or I'll git no weavin' done this year, and what do you think? I've had another visitor to-day, and your comin' right afterwards kind o' struck me as mighty queer, both bein' Akeville people, so to speak tho' it's been a long day since he's been there, and you'll never guess who it was, fur it ...
— What Might Have Been Expected • Frank R. Stockton

... shapeless sculpture decked;" there "the name, the years, spelt by the unlettered muse;" and the holy texts strewn round "that teach the rustic moralist to die." There is still "the ivy-mantled tower," tho the "moping owl" that evening did not "to the moon complain," partly because there was no moon to complain to, and possibly because there was no moping owl in the tower. But there was one little circumstance which I may be pardoned for mentioning. Gray, ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors - Vol. II Great Britain And Ireland, Part Two • Francis W. Halsey

... shepeardes outgoe With singing and shouting and iolly chere: Before them yode[044] a lustre tabrere,[045] That to the many a hornepype playd Whereto they dauncen eche one with his mayd. To see those folks make such iovysaunce, Made my heart after the pype to daunce. Tho[046] to the greene wood they speeden hem all To fetchen home May with their musicall; And home they bringen in a royall throne Crowned as king; and his queene ...
— Flowers and Flower-Gardens • David Lester Richardson

... and the Comet, The. Magic Mirror, The. Meeting of the Ships, The. Meeting of the Waters, The. Melologue. Memorabilia of Last Week. Merrily Every Bosom boundeth. Millennium, The. Mind Not Tho' Daylight. Minstrel-Boy, The. Missing. Morality. Moral Positions. Mountain Sprite, The. Mr. Roger Dodsworth. Musical Box, The. Musings of an Unreformed Peer. Musings, suggested by the Late Promotion of Mrs. Nethercoat. My Birth-Day. My Gentle Harp. ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... round? Though we try no ventures Desperate or strange; Feed on common-places In a narrow range; Never sought for Franklin Round the frozen Capes; Even, with Macdougall, Bagged our brace of apes; Never had our chance, Tom, In that black Redan; Can't avenge poor Brereton Out in Sakarran; Tho' we earn our bread, Tom, By the dirty pen, What we can we will be, Honest Englishmen. Do the work that's nearest, Though it's dull at whiles; Helping, when we meet them Lame dogs over stiles; See in every hedgerow Marks of angels' feet, Epics ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... his own sword, disarm both of his opponents and turn them out of doors. He cannot forgive himself, he says, that he has been 'provoked by two such men to violate the sanctity of his own house.' His only excuse is, 'that there were two of them; and that tho' I drew, yet I had the command of myself so far as only to defend myself, when I might have done with them what I pleased.' According to Richardson, this venial offence is the worst blot on Sir Charles's character. We certainly do not blame him for the attempt to draw an ideally perfect hero. It ...
— Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.) • Leslie Stephen

... away, and the vast level tract of marsh-land was open to my inspection to a distance at least of some five or six English miles, at the extremity of which it was bounded by a rising ground sparsely wooded. I imagined that I could distinguish tho mud-walls of a row of small cottages, partly concealed by a group of trees, though I was by no means sure that it was not a bank of earth or the face of a rock. I looked anxiously round for other indications of life; and after a close ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 458 - Volume 18, New Series, October 9, 1852 • Various

... my liege, my king! "And a great gift I'll gie to thee— "Bauld four and twenty sister's sons, "Sall for thee fecht, tho' ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3) • Walter Scott

... the necessity of complete harmony between our written constitution and the actual facts of our national life; and we maintain that tho true way to eflect this undoubted harmony is not to expel the Bible and all idea of God and religion from our schools, abrogate laws enforcing Christian morality, and abolish all devout observances in connection with government, but to insert an explicit acknowledgment of God and the Bible ...
— The United States in the Light of Prophecy • Uriah Smith

... to be The Chorus-Lady of the Sea; Tho' Mermaids claim her as their kin, Instead of fishy tail and fin Two shapely feet rejoice the view (With all that appertains thereto). When to these other charms we add A voice that drives the hearer mad, Who ...
— The Mythological Zoo • Oliver Herford

... elder boy has got the clear Great brow; tho' when his brother's black Full eye shows scorn, it... Gismond here? And have you brought my tercel back? I just was telling Adela How many birds it struck ...
— Dramatic Romances • Robert Browning

... mischief as tho' she had ten. Look at her eyes, Lady De Courcy. Did you ever see such eyes in a ...
— Barchester Towers • Anthony Trollope

... his first sitting on y^e Bench: Wherein having first proved the Existence of Witches, hee afterwards showed y^e Evil of Endeavouring y^e Conviction of any upon Defective Evidence. The Sermon had the Effect that none were Condemned, who could bee saved w^thout an Express Breach of y^e Law; & then tho' 'twas possible some Guilty did Escape, yett the troubles of those ...
— Salem Witchcraft and Cotton Mather - A Reply • Charles W. Upham

... on Rutgers Farm" is one of pathetic interest. In its first half-century it sheltered a worshipping congregation of staid Knickerbocker type, which, tho blest with a ministry of extraordinary ability and spiritual power, succumbed to its unfriendly ...
— The Kirk on Rutgers Farm • Frederick Bruckbauer

... 'twill, sir," is the answer, in like undertone. "Tho' it won't be any worse. Guess ...
— The Land of Fire - A Tale of Adventure • Mayne Reid

... gave me herself, O Earth, O Sky; Grey sea, she is mine alone! Let the sullen boulders hear my cry, And rejoice tho' they be but stone! ...
— Indian Tales • Rudyard Kipling

... for the spring, and love for youth, Love that should dwell with beauty, mirth, and hope: Or if a later sadder love be born, Let this not look for grace beyond its scope, But give itself, nor plead for answering truth— A grateful Ruth tho' ...
— Poems • Christina G. Rossetti

... by him I adore, * Whom pilgrims seek thronging Arafat; An thou call my name on the grave of me, * I'll reply to thy call tho' my bones go rot: I crave none for friend of my heart save thee; * So believe me, for ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... in Different Places in the Town & out of it Occasions another Breed of Insects well Known by the Name of Musketoes. These Creatures are well disciplined for they do Not Scout in private Places nor in Small Companies as tho Affraid to attack but Joining in as many Different Colloums as there are Openings to Your Dwellings they make a Desperate push and Seldom fail to Annoy their Enemy in Such a Manner that they leave their Adversary in a Scratching humor the Next Morning thro^o Vexation. ...
— Log-book of Timothy Boardman • Samuel W Boardman

... Tho cause of this may, of course, be found in the knowledge that right up and during the British attack all these towns—Marcoing, Noyelles and Masnieres—unvisited by shell fire, were still occupied by their owners. Coming up from where they ...
— Norman Ten Hundred - A Record of the 1st (Service) Bn. Royal Guernsey Light Infantry • A. Stanley Blicq

... hesitated to enter the swinging life-boats. Tho glassy sea, the starlit sky, the absence, in the first few moments, of intense excitement, gave them the feeling that there was only some slight mishap; that those who got into the boats would have a chilly half hour below and might, ...
— Sinking of the Titanic - and Great Sea Disasters • Various

... proved by Reason and Experience, that the Vitrioline Fountain is equall (and not inferior) to the Germaine Spaw. Aris[t]on men udor. Published (with other additions) by John Taylor, Apothecary in York, and there printed by Tho: Broad, ...
— Spadacrene Anglica - The English Spa Fountain • Edmund Deane

... prelimmenerry derangements, till we finds ourselves on board a lovly steemer, bound for Old Ireland, as we allus calls her, tho' I don't spose as she's any older than the rest on us. It was that ruff that I perposed waitin till the sea got smooth; but my Master ony larft, and sed I shood be all rite if I follered his adwice, as he was used to the sea, and rayther liked ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, November 5, 1892 • Various

... man takes or keeps a vow, But just as he sees others do; Nor are they 'bliged to be so brittle As not to yield and bow a little: For as best tempered blades are found Before they break, to bend quite round, So truest oaths are still more tough, And, tho' they bow, are breaking-proof. BUTLER'S "Hudibras," Ep. ...
— Strange Pages from Family Papers • T. F. Thiselton Dyer

... so on.—And as his comments had usually the ill fate to be terminated either in a bon mot, or to be enlivened throughout with some drollery or humour of expression, it gave wings to Yorick's indiscretion. In a word, tho' he never sought, yet, at the same time, as he seldom shunned occasions of saying what came uppermost, and without much ceremony;—he had but too many temptations in life, of scattering his wit and his humour,—his gibes and his jests about him.—They ...
— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman • Laurence Sterne

... Ye kin all see we've got 'em. Time enuf to tell o' the whar an' the wharf or when it kums to a trial. Tho lookin' in yur faces, fellurs, I shed say it's kim to ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... You said in the long ago, When father, yourself, and John, mother, I left, o'er the deep to go. "Giving up three for one!"—mother, You said, and it sank in my heart; For tho' strong was my love for the one, mother, It was hard ...
— Poems of the Heart and Home • Mrs. J.C. Yule (Pamela S. Vining)

... considered the great Benefit that arises to the Publick, from the large Colony of Virginia, I observed, that tho' it be thus advantageous, yet it is capable of great Improvements still, and requires several Alterations, both with Regard to its own Welfare, and the Interest of Great Britain. Observing moreover, ...
— The Present State of Virginia • Hugh Jones

... Palmerston was buried in Westminster Abbey by the order of his Queen, and was attended by the British aristocracy to his grave, which, after a few years, will hardly be noticed by the side of the graves of Fox and Chatham; LINCOLN was followed by tho sorrow of his country across the continent to his resting place in the heart of the Mississippi valley, to be remembered through all time by his countrymen, and by all the ...
— Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Abraham Lincoln - Delivered at the request of both Houses of Congress of America • George Bancroft

... whoa! How like fun you go! Ver-y well, my lit-tle po-ny, Safe's our jaunt tho' rough and sto-ny, Spare, spare, spare, spare, spare! Sure ...
— The White Christmas and other Merry Christmas Plays • Walter Ben Hare

... like enough, tho'f I will say I have known scholars make better use of their time, if he has been so long on the water as you pretend. How ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... story, what a story, tho' it never made a noise Of cherub-headed Jake and Jim, two little drummer boys Of all the wildest scamps that e'er provoked a sergeant's eye, They were first in every wickedness, but one thing could not lie, And they ...
— His Big Opportunity • Amy Le Feuvre

... Zadig; a Performance, that comprehends in it more Instruction than, 'tis possible, you may at first be aware of. I beg you would indulge me so far as to read it over, and then pass your impartial Judgment upon it: For notwithstanding you are in the Bloom of your Life; tho' ev'ry Pleasure courts you; tho' you are Nature's Darling, and have internal Qualities in proportion to your Beauty; tho' the World resounds your Praises from Morning till Night, and consequently you must have a just Title to a superior ...
— Zadig - Or, The Book of Fate • Voltaire



Words linked to "Tho" :   Tai



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