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Cistus   Listen
Cistus

noun
1.
Small to medium-sized evergreen shrubs of southern Europe and North Africa.  Synonym: genus Cistus.



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"Cistus" Quotes from Famous Books



... indicated by that of the seed, as characterizing and defining the limits of Cistineae (namely, Cistus, Helianthemum, Hudsonia and Lechea) I communicated to Dr. Hooker, by whom it is noticed in his Flora Scotica (page 284) published in 1821; where, however, an observation is added respecting Gaertner's description of Cistus and Helianthemum, for ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2] • Phillip Parker King

... the third place, open and flat though the flower be, it is monopetalous; all the four arms of the cross strictly becoming one in the centre; so that, though the blue foils look no less sharply separate than those of a buttercup or a cistus; and are so delicate that one expects them to fall from their stalk if we breathe too near,—do but lay hold of one,—and, at the touch, the entire blossom is lifted from its stalk, and may be laid, in perfect shape, on our paper before us, as easily as if it had been a nicely made-up blue bonnet, ...
— Proserpina, Volume 2 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... Adam's apple was produced from the seed of a sweet orange, which grew close to lemons and citrons. But such facts hardly aid us in determining whether to rank these forms as species or varieties; for it is now known that undoubted species of Verbascum, Cistus, Primula, Salix, &c., frequently cross in a state of nature. If indeed it were proved that plants of the orange tribe raised from these crosses were even partially sterile, it would be a strong argument in favour of their rank as species. Gallesio asserts that this is the case; but he does not ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... returning sun, as we renew the decoration of our apartments from our gay parterres. I make these observations, that I may not be accused of a disregard to chronology, in not precisely stating the year, or rather the months, during which flourished one of a race, who, like the flowers of the cistus, one morning in all their splendour, on the next, are strewed lifeless on the ground to make room for their successors. Speaking of such ephemeral creations, it will be quite sufficient to ...
— The Pacha of Many Tales • Frederick Marryat

... detail in the barricade. Its constituents are taken from stout, thick, strong-veined leaves. I recognize young vine-leaves, pale-coloured and velvety; the leaves of the whitish rock-rose (Cistus albidus), lined with a hairy felt; those of the holm-oak, selected among the young and bristly ones; those of the hawthorn, smooth but tough; those of the cultivated reed, the only one of the Monocotyledones ...
— Bramble-bees and Others • J. Henri Fabre

... with the enthusiasm of a young botanist and a younger traveler, found treasures at every step. The gentle morning breeze came refreshingly down from the hills before them, laden with the perfumes of opening spring; the rich aroma of the gum-cistus, the fragrance of the wild rosemary, and many another sweet-scented plant, pervading the air, yet not oppressing the breath. Mrs. Shortridge expressed, rather strongly, perhaps, her delight at the contrast between the sweet-smelling country and the unsavory towns of the Portuguese. ...
— The Actress in High Life - An Episode in Winter Quarters • Sue Petigru Bowen

... accident, having transplanted one for experiment, and finding it to my astonishment utterly sterile. I formerly thought with you about rarity of natural hybrids, but I am beginning to change: viz., oxlips (not quite proven), Verbascum, Cistus (not quite proven), Aegilops triticoides (beautifully shown by Godron), Weddell's and your orchids (612/5. For Verbascum see "Animals and Plants," Edition II., Volume I., page 356; for Cistus, Ibid., ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II - Volume II (of II) • Charles Darwin



Words linked to "Cistus" :   rock rose, rockrose family, family Cistaceae, genus Cistus, Cistaceae, dilleniid dicot genus, rockrose



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