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Sit   Listen
verb
Sit  v. t.  (past sat, archaic sate; past part. sat, obs. sitten; pres. part. sitting)  
1.
To sit upon; to keep one's seat upon; as, he sits a horse well. "Hardly the muse can sit the headstrong horse."
2.
To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; used reflexively. "They sat them down to weep." "Sit you down, father; rest you."
3.
To suit (well or ill); to become. (Obs. or R.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Sit" Quotes from Famous Books



... unintelligent maid had been standing by my side the whole time. "Excuse me, Sir," she said, "I don't know, but I think there's something wrong with your 'ouse—the little room at the back, where you sit and smoke of an evenin'. There's been a big light there for some time—a wobbly one. I don't know, Sir, but I think ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, May 16, 1917. • Various

... surrounding objects, as the earth or the foliage, would, on the whole, survive the longest, and thus lead to the attainment of those brown or green and inconspicuous tints, which form the colouring (of the upper surface at least), of the vast majority of female birds which sit upon open nests. ...
— Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection - A Series of Essays • Alfred Russel Wallace

... present reside; and so pacific is our taste, that to enjoy the tranquil scenery of Laleham, and the sports of the stream that waters its park, we would willingly forego all the cares of state, and leave its plots and counterplots to more ambitious minds. We could sit by the waters of Laleham, and sing with ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume XIII, No. 370, Saturday, May 16, 1829. • Various

... of medium height, inclining to corpulency, with a very soft and gentle walk and a most invincible habit of silence. Old residents of Leipsic remember his visits to the rehearsals at the Gewandhaus, where for a whole evening he would sit with his handkerchief held over his mouth, never speaking a word to any one from the beginning to the end, and going away as silently as he came. Nevertheless, it was universally recognized that upon these occasions Schumann heartily ...
— A Popular History of the Art of Music - From the Earliest Times Until the Present • W. S. B. Mathews

... was very, very wrong to sit in Angeline's lap and hear her talk so. We mus'n't believe anything for certain ...
— Dotty Dimple At Home • Sophie May

... of the room was a hearth filled with charcoal embers. My host, beckoning to me to take the post of honour by the fire, retired a few paces and folded his arms across his chest; then, assuming a deprecatory air, he asked my permission to sit down. ...
— Russia - As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Various

... pallid cheekes and ashe hew, In which sad Death his pourtraiture had writ, And when those hollow eyes and deadly view, On which the cloud of ghastly night did sit, 305 I match, with that sweete smile and chearful brow, Which all the world subdued unto it, How happie was I ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... entrap her into a secret correspondence. She seemed to hear the tones of Arthur Fletcher's voice, as those of her husband still rang in her ear when he bade her remember that she was now removed from her father's control. Every now and then the tears would come to her eyes, and she would sit pondering, listless, and low in heart. Then she would suddenly rouse herself with a shake, and take up her book with a resolve that she would read steadily, would assure herself as she did so that her husband should still be her hero. The intelligence at any rate was there, and, ...
— The Prime Minister • Anthony Trollope

... At Long Island, on one of my visits, there were ninety-two men on the sick-roll, and only one nurse, and he not a trained nurse. I am also satisfied that the food is insufficient either for sick or well. A reporter of the Boston Post managed to interrogate an old man who was able to sit up by the side of his little cot. In answer to a question, this sick old man said they did not get any milk; and yet there is a large farm attached to the institution, and there is no excuse for not having plenty of milk provided ...
— White Slaves • Louis A Banks

... who had never been awakened from her sound nap until roused by his knocking at the door, scolded him not a little for being out in such tempestuous weather, and a great deal more for having obliged her to sit up and watch all ...
— Newton Forster • Frederick Marryat

... sabotage, assassination, and civil war. These can neither be outlawed nor even effectively guarded against if there are individuals enough who are disposed to wield them. And it is not by any means idle speculation that a country which can sit calmly by and face such evils as are perpetrated by this vast commerce in violence, by this class use of the State, and by such monstrous outrages as were committed in Homestead, in Chicago, and in Colorado, will find one day its composure interrupted by a working class that has suffered ...
— Violence and the Labor Movement • Robert Hunter

... his way, invoked the saints, and cursed his director for his medley of directions many a time, before he stumbled at length on Mr. Boone's house. He was invited to sit down and dine, in the simple backwoods phrase, which is still the passport to the most ...
— The First White Man of the West • Timothy Flint

... use your eyes!" called out Pengelly: but no soul could they see on her besides two or three of the crew forward and a little officer standing aft beside the helmsman. Pengelly ran forward, leaping the thwarts, and fetched the tailor a rousing kick. "Sit up!" he ordered, "and tell us if that's the orficer ...
— News from the Duchy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... no invitation to sit down, for I could not have kept my feet if I had tried, so suddenly and completely did his words astonish ...
— Off-Hand Sketches - a Little Dashed with Humor • T. S. Arthur

... I and they have strayed, Yet never lonely was that desert known For all the Three a grave to-day is made, And here I sit, and ...
— Heroic Romances of Ireland Volumes 1 and 2 Combined • A. H. Leahy

... Mr. Gould, and sent ashore, and the answer came back that they were welcome to visit the orchid houses. Jay Gould, in person, received the party, and, placing it under the personal conduct of his gardener, turned to Edward and, indicating a bench, said: "Come and sit ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok

... assuming a more serious and alarming aspect. Under the specious pretence of deference to Antiquity and respect for primitive models, the foundations of the Protestant Church are undermined by men, who dwell within her walls, and those who sit in the Reformers' ...
— Apologia pro Vita Sua • John Henry Newman

... and grand staircase have always been admired, but, as a whole, the house is large and stately rather than beautiful. Elizabeth is said to have visited here before she became Queen, and in the park, as at Hatfield, an oak is shown as the one under which she loved to sit. From the Hall the most charming walks may be taken in any direction; e.g., through the park S.E. to Lemsford Mill, or S.W. to Cromer Hyde, N.W. to Water End, or N.E. to Ayot Green. More charming still is the ramble—permission should be requested—beside the winding Lea towards ...
— Hertfordshire • Herbert W Tompkins

... to her machine, wondering why she had been requested to do those letters when Nelly Morrison had nothing better to do than sit picking at her type faces with ...
— North of Fifty-Three • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... after they had walked far enough to need a little rest, "let us sit on this nice mossy rock, and you tell me, please, how you came to be living all alone ...
— The Princess Idleways - A Fairy Story • Mrs. W. J. Hays

... kept here for Grandfather and me to sit in together," said little Alice, "and for Grandfather ...
— True Stories from History and Biography • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... are the Invincibles just ahead of them!" exclaimed Dalton. "The two colonels have left the wagon and are riding with their men. See, how erect they sit." ...
— The Shades of the Wilderness • Joseph A. Altsheler

... head to be a philosopher for some time, but tired of it most confoundedly, and very soon gave it up." "Pray, Sir," said Mr. Hume, "in what branch of philosophy did you employ your researches? What books did you read?" "Books?" said Mr. White; "nay sir, I read no books, but I used to sit whole forenoons a-yawning and poking the fire." Boswelliana, p. 221. The French were more successful than Mr. Edwards in the pursuit of philosophy, Horace Walpole wrote from Paris in 1766 (Letters, iv. 466):—'The generality of the men, and more than the generality, ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 3 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... he said, beginning to understand, "I will sit down here on this tree by the road and wait for you. I 'll tie my horse, and you can leave yours here also, if you wish. There is nothing at the Hall, God knows, to make me hurry up there now, since father and Katharine are gone," ...
— For Love of Country - A Story of Land and Sea in the Days of the Revolution • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... delightful and cooling on a hot day but rather public. In the middle of the pateo there stands a curious column—not at all unlike the 'pelourinho'[95] of Cintra—which stands in a basin just before the entrance gate. This column is formed of three twisted shafts on whose capitals sit a group of boys holding three shields charged with the royal arms. All round the court is a dado of white and green tiles arranged ...
— Portuguese Architecture • Walter Crum Watson

... were no chairs on which a sewing-woman might rest herself, however fatigued from carrying a heavy bundle for a mile or two in a hot day. And even had there been such grateful conveniences, we should not have been invited to sit down; and unless invited, no sewing-woman would risk a provocation of the wrath of an ill-mannered shopman by presuming to occupy one. Few employers bestow even a thought upon the comfort of their sewing-women. They seldom ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865 • Various

... of the Valley of Dawnlight had left the heat of the room that looked on the fields, and into which the sun had all day been streaming, and had gone at sunset to sit in the balcony that looked along the street. Often she would do this at sunset; but she rather dreamed as she sat there than watched the street, for all that it had to show she knew without glancing. Evening after ...
— Don Rodriguez - Chronicles of Shadow Valley • Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, Baron, Dunsany

... himself in genuine bewilderment, 'do I linger? Can the cause be cowardice? Can it be sloth? Can it be thinking too precisely of the event? And does that again mean cowardice? What is it that makes me sit idle when I feel it is shameful to do so, and when I have cause, and will, and strength, and means, to act?' A man irresolute merely because he was considering a proposed action too minutely would not feel this bewilderment. A man might feel it whose conscience ...
— Shakespearean Tragedy - Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth • A. C. Bradley

... release from their duties as entertainers. Eleven o'clock came before the last of the ladies departed, and then Mr. Ferris lingered for a tete-a-tete with Miss Sanford, and poor Grace found herself compelled to sit and talk with Mr. Barnard, who was a musical devotee and afflicted with a conviction that they ought to sing duets, and Mrs. Truscott could not be induced to sing duets with any man, unless ...
— Marion's Faith. • Charles King

... country air, you can never catch one in the fields or woods, or guilty of trudging along the country road with dust on his shoes and sun-tan on his hands and face. The sole amusement seems to be to eat and dress and sit about the hotels and glare at each other. The men look bored, the women look tired, and all seem to sigh, "O Lord! what shall we do to be happy and not be vulgar?" Quite different from our British cousins across the water, who have plenty of amusement ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... entreated Cecily (ten minutes ago she would not have added the epithet), 'you won't stay out and sit up for ...
— The Talking Horse - And Other Tales • F. Anstey

... powerful enough to irritate her. "Is Miss L. D. engaged to marry Mr J. E.?" "No," said Lily, out loud. "Lily Dale is not engaged to marry John Eames, and never will be so engaged." She was almost tempted to sit down and write the required answer to Miss M. D. Though the letter had been destroyed, she well remembered the number of the post-office in the Edgware ...
— The Last Chronicle of Barset • Anthony Trollope

... trees are entirely removed not 'barked' at all, and the whole of the bark, even that of the roots, is utilized. It is separated from the wood by beating the stems with sticks or wooden hammers. This is done by women, who sit in circles round large trays, into which they drop the bark as it falls off. It is then left to dry, and afterwards collected and placed in long wooden troughs, where it is stamped fine with heavy wooden stampers. In this condition it is packed ...
— A Visit to Java - With an Account of the Founding of Singapore • W. Basil Worsfold

... all old memories flocking, White memories like the snowflakes round me whirled. "All's well!" I said; "The mothers still sit rocking The ...
— An Anthology of Australian Verse • Bertram Stevens

... enough in time,—as it afterward appeared he did,—for from that day there was no more bleeding. In the course of the second day he began to take short flights about the room, though he seemed to prefer to return to us,—perching on our fingers or heads or shoulders, and sometimes choosing to sit in this way for half an hour at a time. "These great giants," he seemed to say to himself, "are not bad people after all; they have a comfortable way with them; how nicely they dried and warmed me! Truly a bird might do worse than to live ...
— Our Young Folks, Vol 1, No. 1 - An Illustrated Magazine • Various

... you sit starved and thirsty in the midst of fruit and wine like Tantalus? Poor fellow? I think I see your face as you are springing up to the branches and missing your aim. Oh Bacchus! ...
— The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Vol. 1 (of 4) - Contibutions to Knight's Quarterly Magazine] • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... neu sit quinto productior actu Fabula, quae posci vult, et spectata reponi. "If you would have your play deserve success, Give it five acts complete, nor more ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... How in the world did you do it? I never thought you would. Sit right down and make as much as you can of it. Describe how he received you, what you said and what he said and all about it. ...
— Larry Dexter's Great Search - or, The Hunt for the Missing Millionaire • Howard R. Garis

... "let us remain until the interview with Joseph is over. I shall feel no better in the anteroom than here. I never shall be well until I leave this beautiful, fearful Tyrol. Its mountains weigh heavily upon my head and my breast. But let us sit down awhile. I love to listen to the people's talk, when the court ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... a grand oak with wide-spreading branches, under which he used to sit on pleasant days in summer. There he received all persons who had complaints to make, rich and poor alike. Every one who came was allowed to tell his ...
— Famous Men of The Middle Ages • John H. Haaren, LL.D. and A. B. Poland, Ph.D.

... doing you any good to sit here without attention," said Slim at last. "Here is your revolver right alongside you. I will be back within half an hour. I am going ...
— The Brighton Boys in the Radio Service • James R. Driscoll

... not sit still. A terrible feeling that these strangers were determined to separate her from her grandfather made her too restless. It was natural, she thought, that they should wish to do him a kindness, such as providing him with a fine home for life. He was a grown-up man and a very clever one, ...
— A Sunny Little Lass • Evelyn Raymond

... driver. They all assemble with their baskets, which are shallow and without handles, made by themselves of the palmetto and holding from half a peck to a bushel. The corn is given out in the ear, and they sit about or kneel on the ground, shelling it with cleared corn-cobs. Here there are four enormous logs hollowed at one end, which serve as mortars, at which two can stand with their rude pestles, which they strike up and down alternately. It is very hard work, but quicker ...
— Letters from Port Royal - Written at the Time of the Civil War (1862-1868) • Various

... almost the same thing. "Alas! wine therefore lives longer than man, let us then sit down and drink bumpers; life and wine are the same thing." Heu! heu! ergo diutius vivit vinum, quam homuncio. Quare Tangomenas faciamus, vita vinum est. This puts me in mind of what Athenaeus[6] reports of an Egyptian, called Mycernius. ...
— Ebrietatis Encomium - or, the Praise of Drunkenness • Boniface Oinophilus

... he was scarcely noticed. The occasional patrolman did not more than glance at him. And he was fully as indifferent. At his Aunt Sophie's, a policeman—by name Mike Callaghan—had been a frequent visitor, when he was wont to lay off not only his cap but his coat as well, and sit around bareheaded in his shirt-sleeves, smoking. This glimpse of an officer of the law, shorn, as it were, of his dignity, had made Johnnie realize, even as a babe, that policemen are but mortals after all, as ready ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... election presented one noteworthy incident; Horne Tooke, though in holy orders, and consequently supposed to be disqualified, presented himself for election at Westminster; he retired before the close of the poll, and the question of the qualification of clergymen to sit in parliament was not decided until 1801. In consequence of the hostility of the chancellor, Pitt needed some one to lead his party in the lords, and chose William Grenville, the secretary of state for home affairs, who was created ...
— The Political History of England - Vol. X. • William Hunt

... small hope of sport. He did not seem very keen on the subject, and advised us to try some other place, offering to give us recommendations, &c. I returned to a most miserable room, where we could hardly sit, so much were we annoyed by the smoke from the fire; we could scarcely decide which was hardest to bear, the smoke within, or the cold without. With a hearty laugh at the absurdity of coming to such a place as Teniet ...
— Notes in North Africa - Being a Guide to the Sportsman and Tourist in Algeria and Tunisia • W. G. Windham

... itself a consuming fire. The sin is so odious, and a thing so abominable, that it is enough to make all the angels blush to hear it but so much as once mentioned in so holy a place as that is where this great God doth sit to judge. This sin now hangs about the neck of him that hath committed it; yea, it covereth him as doth a mantle. The adversary is bold, cunning, and audacious, and can word a thousand of us into an utter silence in ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... the Spaniard. It is a bitter pill to swallow, an adamantine nut to crack. I suppose he is welcome to take it—when he can; but he knows better than to try. It is the gate of the Mediterranean. Logically, it is an injustice that a stranger should sit in the porter's lodge and swing the key at his girdle; but it is as well that the porter is one who is too surly to barter his trust for gold. So Gabriel Tar will remain intact, until the porter grows feeble ...
— Romantic Spain - A Record of Personal Experiences (Vol. II) • John Augustus O'Shea

... bargain, I thought the interference with my private affairs was rather beyond the limits of literary satire. On the other hand, Lord Byron paid me, in several passages, so much more praise than I deserved, that I must have been more irritable than I have ever felt upon such subjects, not to sit down contented, and think no more about ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. III - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... wolf and the bear. Now in the East there gleams again a star of hope—why shall we not follow it? Never has the chance of the Restoration flamed so high as to-day. Our capitalists rule the markets of Europe, our generals lead armies, our great men sit in the Councils of every State. We are everywhere—a thousand thousand stray rivulets of power that could be blent into a mighty ocean. Palestine is one if we wish—the whole house of Israel has but to speak with a mighty unanimous voice. Poets will sing for us, journalists write for us, diplomatists ...
— Children of the Ghetto • I. Zangwill

... him, perhaps, but certainly not many of the words. The doctor, it was clear, wished to coax from him the most intimate description possible of his experience. He put things crudely in order to challenge criticism, and thus to make his companion's reason sit in judgment on his heart. If this visionary Celt would let his intellect pass soberly and dissectingly upon these flaming states of wider consciousness he had touched, the doctor would have data of real ...
— The Centaur • Algernon Blackwood

... of the excitement families left carrying members dangerously ill. There is reported one interesting case of a family with one of its members sick with pneumonia. As soon as the woman was able to sit up, she was carried away. At St. Louis it was found necessary to stop because of her condition. Finding that she could not recover, they proceeded to Chicago, where she died. Several of the migrants have seen fit to make heroes of themselves by declining to ...
— Negro Migration during the War • Emmett J. Scott

... low; Proceed slow; Rise higher; Take fire; When most impressed Be self-possessed; To spirit wed form; Sit down in ...
— The Preacher and His Models - The Yale Lectures on Preaching 1891 • James Stalker

... do you do, Mr. Baker?" he answered. "I thought I'd find you along here somewhere." He swung up the short walk, and, mounting the steps, grasped the Englishman's extended hand. For a moment the two said nothing. Then Scotty motioned to a chair. "Sit down, won't ...
— Ben Blair - The Story of a Plainsman • Will Lillibridge

... obliged to sit down to supper alone. None of the three enjoyed it. Not only Mr. Carter and Mrs. Forbush, but Julia ...
— The Errand Boy • Horatio Alger

... Lisita," Santiago said, when he thought we were well out of ear-shot of our elders, "you certainly do love to ride in the seat behind, do you not?" and he pulled my hair with the remark, "Better let somebody else sit there, hereafter." But grandmother overheard him and she said, "Go a little slower, my fine fellow. Lisita might have a more brilliant future than you think. And besides, when you, my fine grandson, are scintillating in the world of letters and Rosa is ...
— Paula the Waldensian • Eva Lecomte

... voice of the Master. Oh, where was he now? On some star, doubtless, eagerly following the infinite song of the spheres, a divine music that only his ears had been attuned to hear! And to choke his emotion, the musician would sit down at the piano, while Leonora, responsive to his mood, would approach him, and standing as rigid as a statue, with her hands lost in the musician's head of rough tangled hair, sing a ...
— The Torrent - Entre Naranjos • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... and other birds. The parrots are so stupid that, while one chatters on a tree in whose branches the bird-catcher is concealed, the others flock thither, and allow themselves to be easily caught. They are not frightened when they see the bird-catcher, but sit looking until the noose is thrown round their necks. Even when they see one of their companions captured and thrown into the hunter's bag, they do ...
— De Orbe Novo, Volume 1 (of 2) - The Eight Decades of Peter Martyr D'Anghera • Trans. by Francis Augustus MacNutt

... circus company went into winter quarters. Repairs had been instituted, several rooms were added, and a wide veranda replaced the rickety little porch and gave upon a noble prospect of mountain and valley and river. Here on sunshiny noons in the good Saint Martin's summer the old gran'dad loved to sit, blithe and hearty, chirping away the soft unseasonable December days. Sometimes in the plenitude of content he would give Valeria a meaning glance and mutter "Oh, leetle Owel! Oh, leetle Owel!" and then break into laughter that ...
— Una Of The Hill Country - 1911 • Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

... earnestness that a court martial should sit on his conduct; but this request could not be granted, because the army did not furnish a sufficient number of officers of a grade to form a court for his trial on military principles. Late in the session, a ...
— The Life of George Washington, Vol. 4 (of 5) • John Marshall

... mercy of Christ. I expect no place of repentance: but for the indulgence and mercy of the Redeemer of the world, and for the honour of His holy resurrection, I have this refreshment; for it is the Lord's-day now, and as I sit here I seem to myself in a paradise of delight, by reason of the pains which will be mine this evening; for when I am in my pains I burn day and night like lead melted in a pot. But in the midst of that mountain which you ...
— The Hermits • Charles Kingsley

... came in, Lachlin," said my brother, "I didn't think of you; take a chair here, and never heed the wake to-night, but sit down and tell us about the attack on Vesey Vengeance, long ago. I'll get you a tumbler of punch; and, instead of going to the wake to night, I will allow you to go ...
— The Station; The Party Fight And Funeral; The Lough Derg Pilgrim • William Carleton

... sit, make in the preterit gave, bade, sate; in the participle passive given, bidden, sitten; but in ...
— A Grammar of the English Tongue • Samuel Johnson

... can tell? I ain't set eyes on their turkey lately. If you feel well, you'd better sit up to the table and stone that bowl of raisins. Put your dolly away, and get ...
— Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know • Various

... sister Peggy, "don't sit in that—that's our poor father's chair; an' until he sits in it again, none of ...
— The Black Prophet: A Tale Of Irish Famine • William Carleton

... the fastenings of the house with his own eyes," Mrs. Tadman said; "but up to last autumn he used to go upstairs with me and the servants. It's a new thing for him to sit up drinking his glass of grog in the parlour ...
— Fenton's Quest • M. E. Braddon

... sit down, Old Un," said Ravenslee, drawing up a somewhat worn armchair. "Joe and I are going at it hard and fast this afternoon, and I want you to time the rounds." And he proceeded ...
— The Definite Object - A Romance of New York • Jeffery Farnol

... bedroom, the nurse turned on the lights suddenly, glancing at Grace's face as she did so. The girl did not dare even to blink her eyes. "Sit down," the woman commanded, sharply. Grace sank upon the edge of the bed. "Take off your shoes," the nurse went on, in a stern voice. The girl had slipped on a pair of bedroom slippers—she proceeded to remove them mechanically, fumbling with ...
— The Ivory Snuff Box • Arnold Fredericks

... the lack of manners evinced by this precipitate departure, but arose without speaking to take his own leave. Austin did not offer to escort him downstairs. He rang the bell, which was answered by the gaunt maid who had been engaged to sit as Britannia or the Madonna, and to her he consigned his departing visitor after a soft pressure ...
— The Moon Rock • Arthur J. Rees

... "Shall we sit down on the moss?" she asked, vaguely conscious that his sympathies had, for a moment, ...
— Lorraine - A romance • Robert W. Chambers

... consul is taking the auspices or making a sacrifice. These words mean "Do this thing," and are used to make the bystanders orderly and attentive. Many of his other precepts are like those of the Pythagoreans; for just as they forbid men to sit upon a quart measure, or to stir the fire with a sword, or to turn back when they set out upon a journey, and bid them sacrifice an odd number to the gods above, and an even one to those below, all of which things had a mystical meaning, which was hidden from the common ...
— Plutarch's Lives, Volume I (of 4) • Plutarch

... from the toil of hate we may not cease: Free, we are free to be your friend. And when you make your banquet, and we come. Soldier with equal soldier must we sit, Closing a battle, not forgetting it. With not a name to hide, This mate and mother of valiant "rebels" dead Must come with all her history on her head. We keep the past for pride: No deepest peace shall strike our poets ...
— Old and New Masters • Robert Lynd

... echoed their delighted hostess. "Well, I should think so! I'm just getting my dinner. Of course I'm all alone, this time o' day, but I always say if I'm good enough to cook it well, I'm good enough to eat it comfortable, and I sit down to table just's if the family was all here. There's some that believe in a bite and a bit, when the men folks are out, but I never did. And then—" she blushed shyly like a girl—"I always want to feel ready in case anyone should come. Just in case. He says it's foolishness, ...
— While Caroline Was Growing • Josephine Daskam Bacon

... and Difficulty of Breathing he then complained of, about five Days before, occasioned by catching Cold, on being billeted in a low, cold, and damp House.—His Pulse was quick, the Pain of his Side and Difficulty of Breathing so great, that he could not sleep, nor lie down, but was obliged to sit constantly in an erect Posture; his Tongue was white and furred, and he had had no Stools for three Days: He was ordered to be blooded immediately; and to take a Dose of Salts; and his Side to be rubbed with the linimentum volatile. 3d. His Breathing and Pain of the Side were ...
— An Account of the Diseases which were most frequent in the British military hospitals in Germany • Donald Monro

... Paul happened to sit next to each other at supper, and they conversed together so amicably that Paul, in the hospitality of his heart, expressed a hope that he should see Mr. Pepper at ...
— Paul Clifford, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... withered fingers, for surely there was no necessity for them to learn it. Has not everyone learnt it, this, the first truth of Buddhism, long before his hair is gray, before his hands are shaking, before his teeth are gone? But there they would sit, evening after evening, thinking of the change about to come upon them soon, realizing the emptiness of life, wishing ...
— The Soul of a People • H. Fielding

... in A.D. 177, and remembered Polycarp, who suffered martyrdom at Smyrna in A.D. 156, at the age of eighty-six. Irenaeus, in writing to his friend Florinus, says, "I can describe the very place in which the blessed Polycarp used to sit when he discoursed, and his goings-out and his comings-in, and his manner of life, and his personal appearance, and the discourses which he held before the people, and how he would describe his intercourse with John and the rest who had seen the Lord, and how he would relate their ...
— The Books of the New Testament • Leighton Pullan

... the National Republican Committee, with the right of appeal to the Convention itself. The Committee decided nearly all the contests in favor of Taft's friends, and since all the delegates thus chosen would sit in the Convention and vote on one another's cases, the decision seemed likely to ...
— The United States Since The Civil War • Charles Ramsdell Lingley

... though equally mortified and confounded at the turn of their affairs in Germany, did not sit tamely and behold this reverse; but exerted their usual spirit and expedition in retrieving the losses they had sustained. They assembled a body of troops at Hanau, under the direction of the prince de Soubise, ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... great day for Robin that he should come back to his own country after six years, and be received in this house of strange memories; that he should sit upstairs as a priest, and hear confessions in that very parlour where nearly seven years ago he had sat with Marjorie as her accepted lover—if all this had been charged, to him, with emotions and memories which, however ...
— Come Rack! Come Rope! • Robert Hugh Benson

... explained, and the judges were ready to decide before they understood the question. Pliny, with some indignation, asks, Are we wiser than our ancestors? are the laws more just at present? Our ancestors allowed many hours, many days, and many adjournments, in every cause; and for my part, as often as I sit in judgement, I allow as much time as the advocate requires; for would it not be rashness to guess what space of time is necessary in a cause which has not been opened? But some unnecessary things ...
— A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence • Cornelius Tacitus

... more pathetic than before. Bernardine promised to tell his wife, and went of to find her, making as an excuse a book which Mrs. Reffold had offered to lend her. Mrs. Reffold was in her bedroom. She asked. Bernardine to sit down whilst she searched for the book. She had a very gracious manner ...
— Ships That Pass In The Night • Beatrice Harraden

... cried Joe, "you stay where you are while I go down. No use to take unnecessary risks by both going down together. You sit here, if you don't mind, and wait for me; I won't be any longer ...
— The Boys of Crawford's Basin - The Story of a Mountain Ranch in the Early Days of Colorado • Sidford F. Hamp

... equally passionate repentance, and self-willed disobedience, alternating with sudden bursts of reformation, were a constant source of worry and anxiety, and the direct opposite of her ideal of girlhood. Poor Mrs. Fitzgerald would have liked a docile, tractable daughter, who would have been content to sit beside her sofa doing fancy work, instead of riding to hounds; and who would have had more consideration for her weak state of health. She appreciated Honor's warm-hearted affection to the full, but at the same time wished she could make ...
— The New Girl at St. Chad's - A Story of School Life • Angela Brazil

... ma petite. People are always so at first. To-morrow maybe you can sit up, and a few days after walk. ...
— A Little Girl in Old Quebec • Amanda Millie Douglas

... when they came to Egypt's land, Amongst those fierce wild beasts, Mary, she being weary, Must needs sit down ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow, Vol. IV (of IV) • Harrison S. Morris

... wise and say little In comes Mr. North very sea-sick from shore In perpetual trouble and vexation that need it least Inoffensive vanity of a man who loved to see himself in the glass It not being handsome for our servants to sit so equal with us John Pickering on board, like an ass, with his feathers King do tire all his people that are about him with early rising King's Proclamation against drinking, swearing, and debauchery ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... thoroughly bad. He could not have known when saying so, how much was done for their poor neighbours by such as even these Lovels. It could not be wrong to be soft, and peaceful, and pretty, to enjoy sweet smells, to sit softly, and eat off delicately painted china plates,—as long as no one was defrauded, and many were comforted. Daniel Thwaite, she believed, never went to church. Here at Yoxham there were always morning prayers, and they went to ...
— Lady Anna • Anthony Trollope

... heart's desire and when he finally had driven everything to cover, he came back to the tents, purified in soul as well as in odor, and was willing to sleep during the day and sit up on his haunches at night (when they tied him to the corner of the cabin) and try to howl his head off at ...
— The Girls of Central High in Camp - The Old Professor's Secret • Gertrude W. Morrison

... precisely the same principle in virtue of which he did not feed his dog. Yermolai was a very strange kind of man; heedless as a bird, rather fond of talking, awkward and vacant-looking; he was excessively fond of drink, and never could sit still long; in walking he shambled along, and rolled from side to side; and yet he got over fifty miles in the day with his rolling, shambling gait. He exposed himself to the most varied adventures: spent the night in the marshes, in ...
— A Sportsman's Sketches - Works of Ivan Turgenev, Vol. I • Ivan Turgenev

... carry a rifle across his thighs when he rode up the trail past Devil's Tooth Ridge to the benchland beyond, where his cattle fed on the sweet bunch grass. He never would sit close to a camp-fire at night save when his back was against a huge boulder and he could keep the glare of the fire from his eyes. Indians he killed as he killed rattlers, on the range theory that if ...
— Rim o' the World • B. M. Bower

... had insisted on her learning book-keeping, so that she might escape the common lot of young womanhood; to sit there ...
— Married • August Strindberg

... pair of boots, which would make the wearer invisible, and convey him instantly whithersoever he might wish to go. The King consents to act as umpire, provided he may once try the virtue of the magic garments; but once clothed in them, of course he disappears, leaving the combatants to sit down and suck their thumbs. Now in the "Sea of Streams of Story," written in the twelfth century by Somadeva of Cashmere, the Indian King Putraka, wandering in the Vindhya Mountains, similarly discomfits two brothers who are quarrelling over ...
— Myths and Myth-Makers - Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology • John Fiske

... On the recovery of the lady he placed it under the cushion of her couch, where it remained forgotten for a year, and thus were the first fruits of his tragic genius brooded over, as it were, by the lady and all who chanced to sit ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 3, No. 2, May, 1851 • Various

... offensive Essay on Woman. W. was expelled from the House of Commons and outlawed, but such was the strength of the cause which he championed that, notwithstanding the worthlessness of his character, his right to sit in the House was ultimately admitted in 1774, and he continued to sit until 1790. He was also Lord Mayor ...
— A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature • John W. Cousin

... you repair that magistrate's bench with such great care?" asked a bystander of a carpenter who was taking unusual pains. "Because I wish to make it easy against the time when I come to sit on it myself," replied the other. He did sit on that bench as a magistrate a ...
— How to Succeed - or, Stepping-Stones to Fame and Fortune • Orison Swett Marden

... I am up to my neck in work. We are now expecting a new chief clerk, and I swear by God we have to sit up into ...
— The Precipice • Ivan Goncharov

... "sit down here. Bend your twigs and tie them together, in the first place, for a frame. Then bind the holly on ...
— The Drummer Boy • John Trowbridge

... 'pouding-stone,' when he ees at his home in the country. He ees also a small 'boulder.' I pick him up; I crack him; he made three separate piece of conglomerate sandstone. I bring him home to my wife in my pocket. She rejoice; we are happy. When comes the efening, I sit down and make him a label; while my wife, she sit down and write of the Aztec. Ah, my friend, you shall say of the geology it ees a fine, a BEAUTIFUL study; but the study of the wife, and what shall ...
— Stories in Light and Shadow • Bret Harte

... previous day. He spent most of his time in company with Muskwa. He opened a can of their griddle-cake syrup and by noon he had the cub following him about the tree and straining to reach the dish which he held temptingly just out of reach. Then he would sit down, and Muskwa would climb half over his ...
— The Grizzly King • James Oliver Curwood

... and say a few words to them at home? The grandmother sits and spins yarn for eel-nets. She has now the cataract on the other eye, but her mouth is as well as ever; she does not let herself grow dumb, although she does sit in the dark. Mother provides the baits; she has also enough to do with ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... directions to your servant, "Vite! Vite!" cries a whiskered sentry. Are you looking through the windows of the lobbies into the boxes for your party, you are ordered off by a gendarme. I saw one gentleman-like-looking man remonstrating; in a trice he was in durance vile. A Frenchman at his play must sit, stand, move, think, and speak as if he were on drill, and yet he endures the intolerance for doubtful benefits derived ...
— Before and after Waterloo - Letters from Edward Stanley, sometime Bishop of Norwich (1802;1814;1814) • Edward Stanley

... Drona's son be not made to reap the fruit of that sinful deed of his, if, putting forth your prowess in battle, thou dost not take the life of that wretch of sinful deeds, along with the lives of all his followers, then listen to me, ye Pandavas, I shall sit here in praya!' ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... fallen Virgin, the Soul, Wisdom, or 'the Pearl'.[164:1] The Archontes let him pass because he is disguised; they do not know him (cf. 1 Cor. ii. 7 ff.). When his work is done he ascends to Heaven to sit by the side of the Father in glory; he conquers the Archontes, leads them captive in his triumph, strips them of their armour (Col. ii. 15; cf. the previous verse), sometimes even crucifies them for ever in their places in the sky.[164:2] ...
— Five Stages of Greek Religion • Gilbert Murray

... counter, on which she could for a moment rest a body which had never been accustomed to so long-continued and unnatural a strain upon its powers. It was the peremptory order of the wealthy proprietor that no girl employed in the shop should on any occasion sit down. There were soft stools for the repose of customers who had money to spend, but not even a block for the weary saleswoman who had money to earn. The rich lady, who had promenaded the street until fatigued by the exertion ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 89, March, 1865 • Various

... Captain Rudstone in a harsh voice. "Your tongue is rambling sir. I am doing you a service by requesting you to sit down." ...
— The Cryptogram - A Story of Northwest Canada • William Murray Graydon

... as if they were the cream of the earth, but without anything to make them clergymen but a black coat and a white tie. And then Bishops or Deans come, with women tucked under their arm; and they can't enter church but a fine powdered man runs first with a cushion for them to sit on, and a warm sheepskin to keep their feet ...
— Loss and Gain - The Story of a Convert • John Henry Newman

... they were. Patty and Elise laughed heartily to see Abiram sit up and cross his paws over his fat ...
— Patty's Summer Days • Carolyn Wells

... young friends, I loved to sit beside my grandfather and listen to his stories of Bunker Hill and Saratoga,—how he and his comrades stood upon those fields and fought for their country. I could almost see the fight and hear the cannon's roar, the ...
— My Days and Nights on the Battle-Field • Charles Carleton Coffin

... welcome guests in every household. As Wulf was urged by the prior to come over whenever time hung on his hands, his visits to the monastery were naturally very much more frequent than those of the prior to Steyning. Sometimes he would sit in the private apartment of the prior, but more often he spent his time studying the rare manuscripts, or watching the monks at their work of copying and illuminating. If he went in the evening he generally sat in the refectory, where the monks for the most part spent their evening ...
— Wulf the Saxon - A Story of the Norman Conquest • G. A. Henty

... after death of all truth and good and thereupon are sent into outer darkness. Those who have confirmed themselves by this kind of profanation against the Divine and against the Word and thus against the spiritual things of the Word, sit in outer darkness dumb, unable to speak, wanting to babble pious and holy things as they did in the world, but unable to do so. For in the spiritual world everyone is compelled to speak as he thinks. A hypocrite, however, wants to speak ...
— Angelic Wisdom about Divine Providence • Emanuel Swedenborg

... began another girl, but Laura's hand falling lightly on her lips, cut short the question, and then Laura dropped down on the grass pulling Jim down beside her. Holding his hand in both hers, and softly patting it, she said, "Sit down, girls, and we'll talk this matter over. Jim's hardly big enough or old enough to face you all at once. But, honestly, don't you think there is some truth in what he says? As Camp Fire Girls, do we think as much about patriotism as the Scouts do? ...
— The Torch Bearer - A Camp Fire Girls' Story • I. T. Thurston

... seen on earth. She kissed the babe softly, and, becoming infantine as well as angelic by this contact, sat herself down in a moment on the floor with him, and held out her hand to Mercy. "There," said she, "come, sit beside us, and see how I hate him,—no more than ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 109, November, 1866 • Various

... shall not come up to dinner. There is pressing work here. Tell mamma not to sit up for me. I have my key. I have no chance to get my things for the children. Will you see to it? Here is twenty dollars, and if you need more let them send in the bill. I had only thought of that jig-saw—was it?—that ...
— The Brick Moon, et. al. • Edward Everett Hale

... unbelievers? The deacon was weighing this question, but he recalled how absurd Samoylenko had looked yesterday, and that broke the thread of his ideas. What fun they would have next day! The deacon imagined how he would sit under a bush and look on, and when Von Koren began boasting next day at dinner, he, the deacon, would begin laughing and telling him all ...
— The Duel and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... now, sir; the doctor said if he slept he was on no account to be waked up, so I'll leave you to sit by him, sir, till he wakes, and, please, be ...
— Fighting the Flames • R.M. Ballantyne

... of sorting out those which are for delivery in port from the rest. A fine day is always chosen, generally towards the end of the voyage, when amusements become scarce and the passengers are growing weary. It is pleasant to sit on the rail and see the passengers gather round the heap of letters, and to hear the shouts of merriment when any exceedingly original superscription comes under notice." Such liberties with the mails in the present day would excite consternation in the headquarters of the Post Office Department. ...
— A Hundred Years by Post - A Jubilee Retrospect • J. Wilson Hyde

... "but I shall not go with you. Do not be afraid of my interfering with any one. I shall sit here." ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... don't think it nice here at all," she complained. "I shall sit up straight so the brush ...
— The Country Beyond - A Romance of the Wilderness • James Oliver Curwood

... dreadfully industrious with my music-writing since the middle of September. I sit and walk in ...
— Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 2: "From Rome to the End" • Franz Liszt; letters collected by La Mara and translated

... is meant. It is meant not only that the private rights of citizens and corporations remain, but the citizens retain all the public rights of the State, that is, the right to representation in Congress and in the electoral college, and the right to sit in the convention, which ...
— The American Republic: Its Constitution, Tendencies, and Destiny • A. O. Brownson

... and every night I sit beside the door, And while I knit I keep my gaze upon the mirky moor; I keep old Collie by my side—he's sure to spring and bark, When Ronald comes across the moor to ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... A long pause—I, glued in such anxiety to the odious sofa; you know how impossible it is for me to sit up in such well-bred fashion. Oh, mother, is it possible for any one ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII. • Various

... meal is to be a family one and all are to sit at the table together, plates will be passed from one to another as they are served: but it will still be well to have one person appointed to wait on the table. She should be ready to supply more bread, water, etc., when it is necessary, and to change the plates for the dessert course. ...
— Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Household Science in Rural Schools • Ministry of Education Ontario

... sake, where am I to sit?' inquired the miserable man of an old gentleman, into whose stomach he had just ...
— Sketches by Boz - illustrative of everyday life and every-day people • Charles Dickens

... was walkin on the strand, I spied ane auld man sit On ane auld black rock; and aye the waves Cam washin up its fit. His lips they gaed as gien they wad lilt, But o' liltin, wae's me, was nane! He spak but an owercome, dreary and dreigh, A burden wha's sang was ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... peace! The shades of the Poets will greet thee as they greeted Dante and Virgil, when, thyself a shade, thou goest towards them. The heart that fainted at Francesca's sorrows will not refuse a throb to thine. For there is a gallery of great women, great with and without sin, where thou must sit, between Sappho and Cleopatra, the Magdalen thy neighbor,—nor yet removed wholly out of sight the Mother of ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, Issue 49, November, 1861 • Various

... TRUSTAFORD, a fair, stolid, blue-eyed Saxon, both about sixteen, come in through the front door, behind which they have evidently been listening. They too have prayer-books in their hands. They sidle past Ivy, and also sit ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... let Jean sit. There's plenty i' the Seaton to help. We're gauin' to tak' the markis's cutter. She's a heap easier to lainch, an' she'll ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... WATER When you sit down, in the evening, beside the springs—there is more than one here in the forest—try to understand what they are trying ...
— The Blue Bird: A Fairy Play in Six Acts • Maurice Maeterlinck

... depot, sat about in the waiting room until the train came in, superintended that function, then sojourned to the post office until the mail was sorted, returning later, if he happened to be a particular friend of the depot master, to sit and smoke and yarn until Captain Sol announced that it was ...
— The Depot Master • Joseph C. Lincoln

... prahu, is built of timber at the lower part, the upper is of bamboo, rattan, and kedgang (the dried leaf of the Nepa palm). Outside the bends, about a foot from the water line, runs a strong gallery, in which the rowers sit cross-legged. At the after-part of the boat is a cabin for the chief who commands, and the whole of the vessel is surmounted by a strong flat roof, upon which they fight, their principal weapons being the kris and spear, both of which, to be used ...
— Borneo and the Indian Archipelago - with drawings of costume and scenery • Frank S. Marryat

... the son of Teradion (7), said, "If two sit together and interchange no words of Torah, they are a meeting of scorners, concerning whom it is said, 'The godly man sitteth not in the seat of the scorners' (8); but if two sit together and interchange words ...
— Pirke Avot - Sayings of the Jewish Fathers • Traditional Text

... brings us to the Skipper, whose elaborate couch has already been mentioned—he was a Hollander and one of the strongest, most gentle and altogether most pleasant of men, who used to sit on the water-wagon under the shed in the cour and smoke his pipe quietly of an afternoon. His stocky even tightly-knit person, in its heavy-trousers and jersey sweater, culminated in a bronzed face which was at once as kind and firm a piece ...
— The Enormous Room • Edward Estlin Cummings

... times Amelia scarcely knew. She sat quite unnoticed in her corner, except when Rawdon came up with some words of clumsy conversation: and later in the evening, when Captain Dobbin made so bold as to bring her refreshments and sit beside her. He did not like to ask her why she was so sad; but as a pretext for the tears which were filling in her eyes, she told him that Mrs. Crawley had alarmed her by telling her that George ...
— Vanity Fair • William Makepeace Thackeray

... like lying face down. It was too inviting to a shot in the back. I wanted to roll over and be prepared when they came upon me, to sit up into some sort of firing position. But my white face (and I'll wager it was unwontedly white!) might show up in the dark. So I clawed my fingers into the ground in the hope that I could apply some camouflage in the form of mud. But mud is perverse; it lies yards deep when you don't want it, ...
— Winning a Cause - World War Stories • John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood



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