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Scape   Listen
noun
Scape  n.  
1.
An escape. (Obs.) "I spake of most disastrous chances,... Of hairbreadth scapes in the imminent, deadly breach."
2.
Means of escape; evasion. (Obs.)
3.
A freak; a slip; a fault; an escapade. (Obs.) "Not pardoning so much as the scapes of error and ignorance."
4.
Loose act of vice or lewdness. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Scape" Quotes from Famous Books



... calf and of the goat was brought into the Holies by the priest, because the entrance to the kingdom of heaven was opened to us by the blood of Christ's Passion. Their bodies were burnt without the camp, because "Christ suffered without the gate," as the Apostle declares (Heb. 13:12). The scape-goat may denote either Christ's Godhead Which went away into solitude when the Man Christ suffered, not by going to another place, but by restraining His power: or it may signify the base concupiscence which we ought to cast away ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... long labyrinth had run, Nor made atonement when he did amiss, Had sighed to many, though he loved but one, And that loved one, alas, could ne'er be his. Ah, happy she! to 'scape from him whose kiss Had been pollution unto aught so chaste; Who soon had left her charms for vulgar bliss, And spoiled her goodly lands to gild his waste, Nor calm domestic peace ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... steps,—abandoned—left behind, Thro' burning sands her native Tyre to find. So mad Pentheus saw two suns arise, 585 Two Thebes appear before his haggard eyes. So wild Orestes flies his mother's rage, With snakes, with torches arm'd across the stage, To 'scape her vengeance whereso'er he goes, Pale furies meet him and his ...
— The Fourth Book of Virgil's Aeneid and the Ninth Book of Voltaire's Henriad • Virgil and Voltaire

... to sympathise with you, dear Mrs. Martin, or to neglect to apprise you ourselves of our movements. Indeed, a letter to you should have been written among my first letters on arriving in London, only Henrietta (my scape-goat, you will say) said, 'I will write to Mrs. Martin.' And then after I had waited, and determined to write without waiting any longer, we heard of poor Mrs. Hanford's affliction and your anxiety, and I have considered day after day whether ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1 of 2) • Frederic G. Kenyon

... all intermission; front to front Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself; Within my sword's length set him; if he 'scape, ...
— Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. • H. N. Hudson

... I fly to 'scape from fortune's rage, 'And bear the scars of envy, spite, and scorn, 'Yet with mankind no horrid war I wage, 'Yet with no impious spleen my breast is torn: 'For virtue lost, and ruined man, I mourn. 'O Man! creation's pride, heaven's darling child, 'Whom Nature's best, divinest, gifts adorn, 'Why ...
— The Minstrel; or the Progress of Genius - with some other poems • James Beattie

... a man in your room, he shall shar de fate ob dat villain dat I've 'spected ob bein' a tief afore.' An' he went an' looken in Missy Roberta's room. In a few moments he come back an' say, 'Dere was a man dar, but he 'scape troo de winder on de verandy-roof. Ef I kin discober 'im he shall die too.' Den he say, grave an' sad-like: 'Ladies, dere is bad men in eb'ry army. I'se deeply mort'fied dat dis should happen. You'll bar me witness dat I tried to save you from all 'noyance. I know dis man,' ...
— An Original Belle • E. P. Roe

... unawares, and put them all to the sword. And of later memory, at Yvoy, Signor Juliano Romero having played that part of a novice to go out to parley with the Constable, at his return found his place taken. But, that we might not scape scot-free, the Marquess of Pescara having laid siege to Genoa, where Duke Ottaviano Fregosa commanded under our protection, and the articles betwixt them being so far advanced that it was looked upon as a done thing, and upon the point to be ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... he gave it to you, you gave it your Miss Europa, Miss Europa gave it Minos, Minos gave it Procris, Procris gave it Cephalus. He was also of the fairy kind; so that, like the lawyers of our age, he was too hard for all other sorts of creatures; nothing could scape the dog. Now who should happen to meet but these two? What do you think they did? Dog by his destiny was to take fox, and fox by his fate ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... exercise a superiority over their neighbours." Milton makes a farther and worse insinuation. "Another end," he says, "is thought was aimed at by some of them in procuring by petition this order—that, having power in their hands, malignant books might easier scape abroad [i.e. get about the country], as the event shows." Here was a hit for some of the good people ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... boundary, and that he, the incarnation of the evil, will go with them. Of course, the scourge diminishes from that day. Several who have witnessed this practice in India, have been struck with the remarkable analogy it bears to the scape-goat of the Mosaic dispensation, sent into the wilderness burdened with ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 457 - Volume 18, New Series, October 2, 1852 • Various

... Poor scape-goat of crimes, where,—her part what it may, So tortured, so hunted to die, Foul age of deceit and of hate,—on her head Least stains of gore-guiltiness lie; To the hearts of the just her blood from the dust Not in vain for mercy ...
— Unknown to History - A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland • Charlotte M. Yonge

... qualified to occupy the throne in stormy times than were Louis and Maria. The people were slowly, but with resistless power, rising against the abuses, enormous and hoary with age, of the aristocracy and the monarchy. Louis, a man of unblemished kindness, integrity, and purity, was made the scape-goat for the sins of haughty, oppressive, profligate princes, who for centuries had trodden, with iron hoofs, upon the necks of their subjects. The accumulated hate of ages was poured upon his devoted head. The irresolute ...
— Madame Roland, Makers of History • John S. C. Abbott

... when the high priest's hands had been laid on his head and all the iniquities of the children of Israel confessed over him, was to be sent into the wilderness and loosed. The former goat is called "a sin offering for the people." The latter is called "a scape goat to make an atonement with the Lord." The blood of the sin offering could not have been supposed to be a substitute purchasing the pardon of men's offences, because there is no hint of any such idea in the record, and because it was offered to reconcile "houses," "tabernacles," ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... against all. There is another man within me that's angry with me, rebukes, commands, and dastards me. I have no conscience of marble, to resist the hammer of more heavy offences: nor yet so soft and waxen, as to take the impression of each single peccadillo or scape of infirmity. I am of a strange belief, that it is as easy to be forgiven some sins as to commit some others. For my original sin, I hold it to be washed away in my baptism; for my actual transgressions, I compute and reckon ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... the confusion I had not been able to recall Job's instructions in opening the latch; at last I remembered, and pressed, the screw—the latch rose—I opened the door; but not wide enough to scape through the aperture. The ruffians saw my escape at hand. "Rush the b—cove! rush him!" cried the loud voice of one behind; and at the word, Fib was thrown forwards upon the extended edge of my blade; scarcely with an effort of my own arm, the ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... and imperative kick. At the same time he began to talk to Johnnie, anxiously, soothingly: "It's all right, sonny! It's all right! Keep a stiff upper lip! 'Cause y're home now. Pore kid! My! That was a lucky 'scape!" ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... political and municipal, at work in this conspiracy. They would not hesitate to try to make the old offender a scape-goat, and you know what sort of treatment he would receive in the hands of the police. Play the game, Guy; stick to the job. I'm not asking this of you for my own investigation. I have a dozen, a score of operatives who could each handle the branch you are working up just as well ...
— The Crevice • William John Burns and Isabel Ostrander

... smile or curse, love just the same Brands me and burns. O, cruel woman, spare! O would I were a rock, to 'scape this flame Far off upon ...
— The Elegies of Tibullus • Tibullus

... observes his clock; And, true, as turquoise in the dear lord's ring, Look well or ill with him: 6 ready to praise His lordship, if he spit, or but p—— fair, Have an indifferent stool, or break wind well; Nothing can 'scape their catch. ...
— Sejanus: His Fall • Ben Jonson

... old lady, drily; "but as I have some regard for the conventions, I will present to you, Miss Fairfield, my scape-grace and ne'er-do-well ...
— Patty's Success • Carolyn Wells

... thought of Lancaster To offer violence to his sovereign! We would but rid the realm of Gaveston: Tell us where he remains, and he shall die. Q. Isab. He's gone by water unto Scarborough: Pursue him quickly, and he cannot scape; The king hath left him, and his train is small. War. Forslow no time, sweet Lancaster; let's march. Y. Mor. How comes it that the king and he is parted? Q. Isab. That thus your army, going several ways, Might be of lesser ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... altitude of 5,000 feet, directly after which a dense cloud was entered, which brought the temperature down to 36 degrees. At this elevation the report of a gun was heard. Here Mr. Glaisher attempted (probably for the first time in history) to take a cloud-scape photograph, the illumination being brilliant, and the plates with which he was furnished being considered extremely sensitive. The attempt, however, was unsuccessful. The height of two miles was reached in 19 ...
— The Dominion of the Air • J. M. Bacon

... man I would be in the Rio Grande District. I would carry 'the glad tidings' to the ranger camps on the Chicon and the Secor, and the United States forts on the Mexican border. It is 'the few sheep in the wilderness' that I love to seek; yea, it is the scape-goats that, loaded with the sins of civilized communities, have been ...
— The Hallam Succession • Amelia Edith Barr

... Harold goeth towards his enimies, why his vnskilfull espials tooke the Normans (being old beaten souldiers) for priests; Girth dissuadeth his brother Harold from present incountering with the duke; where note the conscience that is to be had of an oth, and that periurie can not scape vnpunished. ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (8 of 8) - The Eight Booke of the Historie of England • Raphael Holinshed

... the Instructions allowed little over a half-mile. Accepting the Court's finding that he was in position at dark, this distance can only be attributed, as Lestock argued and the Court admitted, to a current—that most convenient of scape-goats in navigation. The allies, too, had a lagging rear body, five Spanish ships being quite a distance astern; but from van to rear they extended but six miles, against the British nine. It was the distance ...
— Types of Naval Officers - Drawn from the History of the British Navy • A. T. Mahan

... boat of the cold water, and then the cry rises; [Gh]et coruen ay e cordes & kest al er-oute Yet cut they the cords and cast all there-out. Mony ladde er forth-lep to laue & to kest Many a lad there forth leapt to lave and to cast, Scopen out e scael water, at fayn scape wolde To scoop out the scathful water that fain escape would; For be monnes lode neuer so luer, e lyf is ay swete For be man's lot never so bad, the life is aye ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... heavens, and your faire handeling Have made you master of the field this day, 245 Your fortune maister[*] eke with governing, And well begun end all so well, I pray. Ne let that wicked woman scape away; For she it is, that did my Lord bethrall, My dearest Lord, and deepe in dongeon lay, 250 Where he his better dayes hath wasted all. O heare, how piteous he to you for ayd ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... or religious books which do not go on the supposition that this doctrine is taught in Scripture. And you may hear sermon after sermon from some preachers, the chief object of which is to point out correspondences between the paschal lamb, the scape-goat, and other sacrifices under the Law, and Jesus and the sacrifice which He offered. Some preachers and religious writers take almost all things under the law to be types of Christ, or types of things pertaining to Him. They make Noah, and Isaac, and ...
— Modern Skepticism: A Journey Through the Land of Doubt and Back Again - A Life Story • Joseph Barker

... self be but last May's elf, wing shifted, eye sheathed— Changeling in April's crib rocked, who lets 'scape rills locked fast since frost breathed— Skin cast (think!) adder-like, now bloom bursts ...
— The Heptalogia • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... government) Lempriere and Prynne—now completely reconciled—paced slowly up and down, talking of the present situation and future policy. As they did so their eyes glanced from time to time on the fair sea scape, illumined by the early autumn sunlight, and shaded by the ...
— St George's Cross • H. G. Keene

... the admirable helpmate my scape-grace has had the saving good luck to find? A daughter of the worthy man who undertook the care of poor Dr. Lloyd's orphans,—the orphans who owed so much to your generous exertions to secure a provision for them; and that child, ...
— A Strange Story, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... are chill here; you want the sun That shines at court; make ready for the journey. Pray God, we 'scape ...
— Queen Mary and Harold • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... nearer come; They buzz and blink, and doubtfully they tread On the strong bird-lime of the utmost thread; But when they're once entangled by the gin, With what an eager clasp he draws them in; Nor shall they 'scape, till after long delay, And all that sweetens life is drawn away. "Nay, this," you cry, "is common-place, the tale Of petty tradesmen o'er their evening ale; There are who, living by the legal pen, Are held in honour,—'Honourable men'" Doubtless—there are who hold manorial courts, Or ...
— The Borough • George Crabbe

... Bertram, sirs, of Ghent; And—beat for jubilee the drum!— A maid and minstrel with him come.' Bertram, a Fleming, gray and scarred, Was entering now the Court of Guard, A harper with him, and, in plaid All muffled close, a mountain maid, Who backward shrunk to 'scape the view Of the loose scene and boisterous crew. 'What news?' they roared:—' I only know, From noon till eve we fought with foe, As wild and as untamable As the rude mountains where they dwell; On both sides store of blood is lost, Nor much success can either boast.'— ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... for, to the honour of his God, and not to make a mart of the wicked treasure of the infidels." Yet did these words sink nothing unto their stomachs; they did it for a good intent. So did Saul save the fattest oxen to offer unto the Lord, and they to serve their own turn. But neither did Saul scape the wrath of God therefor, neither had these that thing which they desired so, and did thirst after. Such is God's justice. He that they put their trust in to deliver them from the tyrannous hands of their enemies, he, I say, could ...
— Voyager's Tales • Richard Hakluyt

... looks on him, with him her heart is pleased, When she beholds, she can but smile for glee. Was no pagan of such high chivalry. Comes through the press, above them all cries he, "Be not at all dismayed, King Marsilie! To Rencesvals I go, and Rollanz, he Nor Oliver may scape alive from me; The dozen peers are doomed to martyry. See here the sword, whose hilt is gold indeed, I got in gift from the admiral of Primes; In scarlat blood I pledge it shall be steeped. Franks shall be ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... this battle had not been so exceeding great, he could scarce have wished the victory at the price he knew he must pay for it, in being subject to the reading and hearing of so many ill verses as he was sure would be made on that subject; adding, that no argument could 'scape some of these eternal rhymers, who watch a battle with more diligence than the ravens and birds of prey, and the worst of them surest to be first in upon the quarry; while the better able, either out of modesty writ not at all, or set ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845 • Various

... the mead, the bough burst forth, As wildly rang that Runic strain; Sir Thunye fiercely spurred his steed, But, ah! to ’scape he ...
— Ermeline - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... demanded enlightenment. To them Judge Harvey told of the visit of the four police officers, scathingly expounded the character of Matilda's brother, and explained how he, Judge Harvey, had been forced to protect the outrageous scape-grace. Through this recital, Mr. Pyecroft, though unbowed by shame, continued to wear ...
— No. 13 Washington Square • Leroy Scott

... dame Threaten'd our power in dust to lay And wrap the Capitol in flame, Girt with her foul emasculate throng, By Fortune's sweet new wine befool'd, In hope's ungovern'd weakness strong To hope for all; but soon she cool'd, To see one ship from burning 'scape; Great Caesar taught her dizzy brain, Made mad by Mareotic grape, To feel the sobering truth of pain, And gave her chase from Italy, As after doves fierce falcons speed, As hunters 'neath Haemonia's sky Chase the tired hare, so might he lead The fiend enchain'd; SHE ...
— Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace • Horace

... and of the oxygen at the point of the cylinder produces solely the vapor or steam of water. I have, therefore, provided the lower part of the cylindrical iron box with a scape-pipe, with a valve operating by means of a pressure of two atmospheres; consequently, so soon as this amount of pressure is attained, the steam ...
— Five Weeks in a Balloon • Jules Verne

... respect, Will place thee with the worthiest of that sect. Then let not ignorance, nor enuie mooue thee Thou hast done well, they do not that reproue thee: Yet some (true worth nere wants an opposite) will Carpers be: Grieue not at this, not vertues selfe can scape their obloquie, But giue the raynes vnto these baser spirits, Whose Iudgements cannot paralell thy merrits, Such fooles (to seeme iudicious) take in hand, To censure what they doe not vnderstand. Yet ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... the bill, and to-morrow our correction goes to the Lords. It will be a day of wonderful expectation.. to see in what manner they will swallow their vomit. The Duke of Bedford, it is conjectured, will stay away:—but what will that scape-goose, Lord Halifax, do, who is already convicted of having told the King a most notorious lie, that if the Princess was not given up by the Lords, she would be unanimously excluded by the Commons! The Duke of Bedford, who had broke ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... dost not know me, boy; and well for thee Thou dost not. I'm the father of a son About thy age. Thou, I see, wast horn, like him, upon the hills: If thou shouldst 'scape thy present thraldom, he May chance to cross thee; if he should, I pray thee Relate to him what has been passing here, And say I laid my hand upon thy head, And said to thee, if he were here, as thou art, Thus would I bless him. Mayst thou live, my boy, To see ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... into his religion, one of his favorite exhortations in the prayer-meeting being, "Ef you sinners wants to'scape you'se got to git up an' git." During the preaching service he took a high seat in the synagogue, and if any one in the range of his vision appeared drowsy he would turn round and glare till the offender ...
— The Earth Trembled • E.P. Roe

... Away they fly to 'scape the rout, Their steeds they soundly switch; Some are thrown in, and some thrown out, And some thrown in the ditch. Yet a hunting we ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... to seek out "Mary Stuart." All hope of a comfortable future was not lost. "Mary Stuart" must provide for her scape-goat. It should be her pleasing duty to clothe and feed that hapless animal for ...
— The Missing Link • Edward Dyson

... the nineteenth century it is the custom to admit that the climate is bad and dangerous; but that it has often been made the scape-goat of European recklessness and that much of the sickness and death might be avoided. The improvement is attributed to the use of quinine, unknown to the early settlers, and much is expected from sanatoria and from ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... Black; the antennae and the head above their insertion ferruginous, the scape black, the head coarsely punctured. Thorax: coarsely punctured; the mesothorax with an abbreviated deeply impressed line in the middle of its anterior margin; wings fulvo-hyaline, the nervures ferruginous; the apex of the wings slightly fuscous, the anterior pair with two submarginal cells ...
— Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society - Vol. 3 - Zoology • Various

... that Madame Sand would not very soon have become disgusted with active politics, for which her temperament unfitted her in every respect. Impetuous and uncompromisingly sincere, she was predestined to burn her fingers; proud and independent, to become something of a scape-goat, charged with all the follies and errors which she repudiated, as well as with those for which she was ...
— Famous Women: George Sand • Bertha Thomas

... dying in his own little capital of Pithoria[3] from a similar epidemic, he had, he said, tried the same thing with still greater effect; but, on that occasion, he had the aid of a man very learned in such matters. This man caused a small carriage to be made up after a plan of his own, for a pair of scape- goats, which were harnessed to it, and driven during the ceremonies to a wood some distance from the town, where they were let loose. From that hour the disease entirely ceased in the town. The goats never returned. ...
— Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official • William Sleeman

... nor greatness in mortality Can censure 'scape; backwounding calumny The whitest virtue strikes. What king so strong Can tie the gall ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... being ill at ease: He hated that He cannot change His cold, Nor cure its ache. 'Hath spied an icy fish That longed to 'scape the rock-stream where she lived, And thaw herself within the lukewarm brine O' the lazy sea her stream thrusts far amid, A crystal spike 'twixt two warm walls of wave; Only she ever sickened, found repulse At the other kind of water, not her life, ...
— English Critical Essays - Nineteenth Century • Various

... train cold Foresight move, Shunning the rose to 'scape the thorn; And Prudence every fear approve, And ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... were slow, deliberate, clean-cut, there was a hissing prolongation of the one sibillant that gave the impression of the 'scape-valve of some pent-up power that bore a ton to the square inch. There was a blaze, a glitter, in the dark, snapping eyes; there was a pitiless, contemptuous, murderous set to the lips and jaw; a fearful ...
— Marion's Faith. • Charles King

... well, as he leaped into his selle, That few would 'scape to tell how they fared; And Gilkison and Nares, both mounted on their mares, Looked terrible ...
— The Bon Gaultier Ballads • William Edmonstoune Aytoun

... has taken but a dark Emblem to be distinguish'd by, for this of a Goat was said to be a Creature hated by Mankind from the beginning, and that there is a natural Antipathy in Mankind against them: Hence the Scape Goat was to bear the Sins of the People, and to go into the Wilderness with all that Burthen ...
— The History of the Devil - As Well Ancient as Modern: In Two Parts • Daniel Defoe

... wrongs in marble: he more just, Stoop'd down serene and wrote them in the dust,— Trod under foot, the sport of every wind, Swept from the earth and blotted from his mind. There, secret in the grave, he bade them lie, And grieved they could not 'scape ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... thought, as your parents did, that marriage with a count would make a real countess of you. What rot! You are a simple, lovable American girl and that's all there ever can be to it. To the end of your days you will be an American. It is not within the powers of a scape-grace count to put you or any other American girl on a plane with the women who are born countesses, or duchesses, or anything of the sort. I don't say that you suffer by comparison with these noble ladies. As a matter of fact you are surpassingly finer in every way than ninety-nine ...
— A Fool and His Money • George Barr McCutcheon

... the rumor to its source—presently it began to be bruited about among the boys that Seabrooke was keeping it for his own use and had never intended to return it to Percy, and was now making him his scape-goat. ...
— Bessie Bradford's Prize • Joanna H. Mathews

... oars, and old Bob stood up in the bows, scanning the river-scape with keen eyes shielded by a level palm. Young William drooped forward suddenly, head upon knees, and breathed convulsively. The boat drifted listlessly ...
— The Black Bag • Louis Joseph Vance

... breathed * But whenas Destiny descends she blindeth human sight[FN111] What shall the hapless archer do who when he fronts his foe * And bends his bow to shoot the shaft shall find his string undight? When cark and care so heavy bear on youth[FN112] of generous soul * How shall he 'scape his lot and where from ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... Some innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt. Melt Egypt into Nile! and kindly creatures Turn all to serpents! Call the slave again; Though I am mad, ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... I!" Blount exploded. "Let it be understood, once for all, Mr. Bentley, that I am not the scape-goat for all the other departments! I have cut it off short; I am ...
— The Honorable Senator Sage-Brush • Francis Lynde

... destroyed, or driven for refuge, into other countries, by the savage persecution of the people, who spare no pains to kill, and catch them for their own subsistence. Scarce a sparrow, red-breast, tomtit, or wren, can 'scape the guns and snares of those indefatigable fowlers. Even the noblesse make parties to go a la chasse, a-hunting; that is, to kill those little birds, which they eat as gibier, ...
— Travels Through France and Italy • Tobias Smollett

... can only destroy our souls, and hath assured our resurrection, either of our bodies or names, hath directly promised no duration. Wherein there is so much of chance, that the boldest expectants have found unhappy frustration; and to hold long subsistences, seems but a scape in oblivion. But man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes, and pompous in the grave, solemnizing nativities and deaths with equal luster, nor omitting ceremonies of bravery in the infamy ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume III (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland I • Francis W. Halsey

... were away on a visit while I was working in Redclay. His niece—or, rather, his wife's niece—a girl named Ruth Wilson, did the housekeeping. She was an orphan, adopted by her aunt, and was general slavey and scape-goat to the family—especially to the brats, as is often the case. She was rather pretty, and lady-like, and kept to herself. The women and girls called her Miss Wilson, and didn't like her. Most of the single men—and some of the married ...
— Over the Sliprails • Henry Lawson

... has manifestly wrought A miracle in thy behalf! I scarce Can credit my own eyes. But tell me, now, Whither you purpose to betake yourself? For you will be in peril, should perchance The Viceroy 'scape this tempest ...
— Wilhelm Tell - Title: William Tell • Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller

... their lives And seek a refuge in the mountain caves, Firm earth's support. An angel drove them back, 1540 Compassing all the town with gleaming fire, With savage flames. Wild beat the sea within; No troop of men could scape from out the walls. The waves waxed, and the waters thundered loud; The firebrands flew; the flood welled up ...
— Andreas: The Legend of St. Andrew • Unknown

... over the dead I like not. All the counsel, thou hast said, Was thine alone; and thine the will that spilled This piteous blood. As justice is fulfilled, Thou shalt not 'scape—so my heart presageth—-The day of ...
— Agamemnon • Aeschylus

... to all our factories, acquaint them with these blessed tidings: If we can 'scape so cheap, 'twill be no matter what villanies henceforth ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... till I come back again. No, no; I have lost plenty of apples, and have long wanted to find the robbers out; now I've caught one I'll take care that he don't 'scape without apple-sauce, at all events—so come down, you young thief, come down directly—or it will be all the ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Captain Frederick Marryat

... Macdonald and a splendid party;[397] amongst others, Marshal Marmont—middle size, stout-made, dark complexion, and looks sensible. The French hate him much for his conduct in 1814, but it is only making him the scape-goat. Also, I saw Mons. de Mole, but especially the Marquis de Lauriston, who received me most kindly. He is personally like my cousin Colonel Russell. I learned that his brother, Louis Law,[398] my old friend, ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... from Picardy).[13] Oh! Aa can stand nowt more; aa'm rait winded! Ah! good for nowt, thou's made me run well for it; thou'lt not 'scape me now. Joostice! Joostice! Aa forbid the weddin. (To ORONTE) He's my ain man, Mast-ther, and as sh'd joost loik to ave him stroong ...
— Monsieur de Pourceaugnac • Moliere

... of the appeal was no doubt distinctly visible in the lady's mind, though it was not accurately worded. I saw that I stood marked to be the scape goat of the day, and humbly continued to deserve well, notwithstanding. By dint of simple signs and nods of affirmative, and a constant propulsion of my friend's arm, I drew him into the boat, and thence projected him up to the level with his ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... in Leviticus 16: 21-22-23; but whether its application can be found is uncertain. Horticulturists are prone to find scape-goats to carry their sins of omission and commission; and they load these—a great burden—upon them, and send them off to be lost in the wilderness. Providence is most usually chosen by them for this purpose. Most of their mistakes and failures—sins, let us call ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 1, January 5, 1884. - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... that God has given To 'scape from hell, and fly to heaven, The day of grace, and mortals may Secure the ...
— Hymns and Spiritual Songs • Isaac Watts

... bring you to your feeling, you good-for-nothing scape-grace," said the master, mad with passion, and surprised that Paul made no outcry. He gave another round, bringing the ferule down with great force. Blood began to ooze from the pores. The last blow spattered the drops around ...
— Our Young Folks, Vol 1, No. 1 - An Illustrated Magazine • Various

... might have thrown a sixpence to you in remembrance of the clever knave you used to be; but since you try to palm these stale tricks upon one you might have known better, I'll not part with a halfpenny—nor would I to save you from rotting. And remember this, 'scape-gallows,' said Ralph, menacing him with his hand, 'that if we meet again, and you so much as notice me by one begging gesture, you shall see the inside of a jail once more, and tighten this hold upon me in intervals of the hard labour that vagabonds are put ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... count, That throld both laid and tall; And then as they strove to 'scape through the door, She ...
— Tord of Hafsborough - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... plantation of this isle, my lord—Antonio. He'd sow't with nettle-seed. Sebastian. Or docks or mallows. Gonzalo. And were the king on't, what would I do? Sebastian. 'Scape being drunk, for want of wine. Gonzalo. I' th' commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things: for no kind of traffic Would I admit; no name of magistrate; Letters should not be known; wealth, poverty, And use of service, none; contract, ...
— Characters of Shakespeare's Plays • William Hazlitt

... napping, And against all Things that can happen Both to the Shrub and Tree, has told some How to make the deadliest Wholesome; These venomous Vulvaria grow At Vaux-Hall and St. James's too; Nay, and about the Tree so leap, That very few good Plants can 'scape. ...
— The Ladies Delight • Anonymous

... mercy!' cried the duchess, joining her hands. 'Have ye, scape-graces indeed, brought your gallants hither? I dare not inquire further. May be, ye have hidden them in your chambers? Meggy (the duchess's nurse), beg his lordship to come hither; I must talk the matter ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2, No. 12, May, 1851. • Various

... with a strong conviction that efforts were being made, by whom I knew not, to turn the whole force of thought upon me and make of me a scape goat in the matter. I retired, but not to shut my eyes in sleep for the night. For a time my mind remained in confusion about those lectures, but after resting awhile, and the excitement had passed off, all came clearly to view, as given on a ...
— The Prison Chaplaincy, And Its Experiences • Hosea Quinby

... chivalry extant now-a-days is consistency. The forty-eight hours' bombardment had been threatened long ere Long Cecil emerged from the workshop in the panoply war. But it was enough for the nonce to have even an inanimate scape-goat with which to relieve our grief—in the absence of something ...
— The Siege of Kimberley • T. Phelan

... thou art furnished with hidden lore, To 'scape thy due reward if any day Without some task accomplished passed ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... this worlde lyueth well and ryghtwysly Sall deye well by ryght good knowlegynge Who in this worlde lyueth yll and wrongfully Shall hardly scape to haue good endynge I do graunte mercy but no tyme enlongynge Wherfore good brederne whyles that ye haue space Amend your lyfe and ...
— The Conuercyon of swerers - (The Conversion of Swearers) • Stephen Hawes

... reputation of being a scape-grace and a ne'er-do-well. He was about the age of John Haynes, but had not attended school for a couple of years, and, less from want of natural capacity than from indolence, knew scarcely more than a boy of ten. His father was a shoemaker, and had felt obliged to keep his ...
— Frank's Campaign - or the Farm and the Camp • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... man after his desert, and who shall 'scape whipping? Use them after your own honour and dignity: The less they deserve, the more merit is in ...
— Hamlet • William Shakespeare

... departed; my brother talked much about the painter. "He is a noble fellow," said my brother; "but, like many other noble fellows, has a great many enemies; he is hated by his brethren of the brush—all the land and water-scape painters hate him—but, above all, the race of portrait painters, who are ten times more numerous than the other two sorts, detest him for his heroic tendencies. It will be a kind of triumph to the last, I fear, when they hear he has condescended ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... maze, a labyrinth of errors, a desert, a wilderness, a den of thieves, cheaters, &c., full of filthy puddles, horrid rocks, precipitiums, an ocean of adversity, an heavy yoke, wherein infirmities and calamities overtake, and follow one another, as the sea waves; and if we scape Scylla, we fall foul on Charybdis, and so in perpetual fear, labour, anguish, we run from one plague, one mischief, one burden to another, duram servientes servitutem, and you may as soon separate weight from lead, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... Burton was, of course, unable to accompany him. They separated at Liverpool, 24th August 1861. An embrace, "a heart wrench;" and then a wave of the handkerchief, while "the Blackbird" African steam ship fussed its way out of the Mersey, having on board the British scape-goat sent away—"by the hand of a fit man"—one "Captain English"—into the wilderness of Fernando Po. "Unhappily," commented Burton, "I am not one of those independents who can say ce n'est que le premier pas qui coute." The stoic, however, ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... opportunity Is never offered twice; seize then the hour When fortune smiles and duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the spectre fear, Nor pause, though pleasure beckon from her bower; But bravely bear thee onward to ...
— Architects of Fate - or, Steps to Success and Power • Orison Swett Marden

... all On whom those fainter beams of love did fall; Marry those loves, which in youth scattered be On face, wit, hopes, (false mistresses), to thee. Churches are best for prayer that have least light: To see God only, I go out of sight; And, to 'scape stormy days, I ...
— England's Antiphon • George MacDonald

... Cicero's view, it seems, of the matter, as insinuated in this letter and in his speech against Vatinius (Sec.Sec. 24-26; cp. pro Sest. Sec. 132). In the letter, however, his insinuations seem directed against Caesar: in the speech Vatinius is the scape-goat. But Vettius was not only a liar, but a bad liar. He made blunders; and when he brought in the name of Bibulus, he was not aware that Bibulus had got scent of something going on, and had secured himself by giving Pompey warning. ...
— The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1 - The Whole Extant Correspodence in Chronological Order • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... and Nor'-Westers' interests against those of the Hudson's Bay. It is not pleasant to recall what was done between the cedars and the shore. I do not attempt to justify our conduct. Does the physician justify medical experiments on the criminal, or the sacrificial priest the driving of the scape-goat into the wilderness? Suffice it to say, when I went down to the shore, Louis Laplante was sitting in the midst of empty drinking-flasks, and the wily, old Nor'-Wester was tempting the silly boy to take more by drinking his health with fresh bottles. But while Louis Laplante ...
— Lords of the North • A. C. Laut

... applied to him in the senate of the nation! Society, expiring under the weight of its own vices, saw in him that well-defined excess that entitled it to the merits of purgation in his extruism, of atonement in his martyrdom, and to place the hand of menace and malediction on his head, as the scape-goat ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 3, August, 1850. • Various

... that he came to the end of it, for at least there was nothing which compromised him seriously with the king; but every nerve in his great body tingled with rage as he thought of the way in which his young scape-grace had alluded to him. "The viper!" he cried. "Oh, the foul snake in the grass! I will make him curse the day ...
— The Refugees • Arthur Conan Doyle

... In de awful jedgment day. "Oh, monahs, you may stan' dar er weepin', Fur de brooms uv de Lord is er sweepin', An' all de trash dey's er heapin' Outside er de golden gate. "So, sinners, yer'd better be er tu'nin', Er climin' an' er scramblin' an' er runnin', Fur ter 'scape dat drefful burnin' In ...
— Diddie, Dumps, and Tot • Louise-Clarke Pyrnelle

... 'scape-valve jetted clouds of flat-driven steam. No. 4 had suddenly "shut off," and was now coasting downhill like a ...
— To The Front - A Sequel to Cadet Days • Charles King

... 'scape dat," remarked Chloe, laughing; "ef Massa had come jes a minute sooner, de cat been out de bag ...
— Holidays at Roselands • Martha Finley

... concealed the mystery upon which the whole interest of the book depended. In the first draft I made Frettlby the criminal, but on reading over the M.S. I found that his guilt was so obvious that I wrote out the story for a second time, introducing the character of Moreland as a scape-goat. Mother Guttersnipe I unearthed in the slums off Little Bourke Street; and I gave what I am afraid was perhaps too vivid a picture of her language and personality. These I have toned down in the present edition. Calton and the two lodging-house ...
— The Mystery of a Hansom Cab • Fergus Hume

... here, Duke William, your competitors, That were consenting to my daughters scape. Let them resolve you of the truth herein. And here I vow and solemnly protest, That in thy presence they shall lose their heads, Unless I hear ...
— Fair Em - A Pleasant Commodie Of Faire Em The Millers Daughter Of - Manchester With The Love Of William The Conquerour • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... of tumultuous conflict on the very spot which the conspirators had possessed. Surprised at this occurrence, the meaning of which he could not comprehend, Peregrine ordered his myrmidons to halt and reconnoitre; and immediately his ears were saluted with an exclamation of "You shan't 'scape me, rascal." The voice being quite familiar to him, he at once divined the cause of that confusion which they had observed; and running up to the assistance of the exclaimer, found a fellow on his knees begging his life of Mr. ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... canst not want a pension, go switch me up a Covey of young Scholars, there's twenty nobles, and two loads of Coals, are not these ready wayes? Cosmography thou art deeply read in, draw me a Map from the Mermaid, I mean a midnight Map to scape the Watches, and such long sensless examinations, and Gentlemen shall feed thee, right good Gentlemen, ...
— Wit Without Money - The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher • Francis Beaumont

... form, nor dappled hide, Nor branchy head will long abide; Nor fleetest foot that scuds the heath, Can 'scape the fleeter ...
— Pastoral Poetry and Pastoral Drama - A Literary Inquiry, with Special Reference to the Pre-Restoration - Stage in England • Walter W. Greg

... not thus to scape! Thy guardian still, in every shape, Shall covertly those steps pursue, And keep thy welfare still in view! More fondly hovering than the dove Shall be my ever watchful love! Than the harp's tones more highly wrought, ...
— The Lay of Marie • Matilda Betham

... of the people. Law himself became the dupe of the regent, who transferred the burden of fifteen hundred millions of the king's debts to the shoulders of the subjects, while the projector was sacrificed as the scape-goat of the political iniquity. The South-Sea scheme promised no commercial advantage of any consequence. It was buoyed up by nothing but the folly and rapaciousness of individuals, which became so blind and extravagant, that Blunt, with moderate talents, was able to impose upon the whole ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... 'scape shot-free at London, I fear the shot here; here's no scoring but upon the pate.—Soft! who are you? Sir Walter Blunt: there's honour for you! here's no vanity! I am as hot as molten lead, and as heavy too: God keep ...
— King Henry IV, The First Part • William Shakespeare [Hudson edition]

... dark as to its westward gables save for the lighted upper windows marking the sick-room and its antechamber, loomed in massive solidity among its sheltering oaks; and the moon, which had now topped the hills and the crimsoning smoke haze, was bathing land- and lake-scape in a flood of silver light, whitening the pale yellow sands of the beach and etching fantastic leaf-traceries on the gravel of ...
— The Price • Francis Lynde

... approval rose amid the scape-graces, as if the fact of possessing a papa dead in a cemetery made their comrade big enough to crush the other one who had no papa at all. And these rogues, whose fathers were for the most part evil-doers, drunkards, thieves, and ill-treaters of ...
— Selected Writings of Guy de Maupassant • Guy de Maupassant

... collect as early as the snows disappear in the spring and continue to collect it until) the quawmash supplys it's place which happens about the latter end of June. the quawmash is also collected for a few weaks after it first makes it's appearance in the spring, but when the scape appears it is no longer fit for use untill the seed are ripe which happens about the time just mentioned, and then the cows declines. the latter is also frequently dryed in the sun and pounded afterwards and then used ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... cruelty can never 'scape the scourge Of shame, of horror, or of sudden death; Repentance self that other sins may purge Doth fly from this, so sore the soul it slayeth; Despair dissolves the tyrant's bitter breath, For sudden vengeance suddenly alights On cruel ...
— Gossip in a Library • Edmund Gosse

... Least Butterwort; in D. 1021 called Villosa, the scape of it being hairy. I have not yet got rid of this absurd word 'scape,' meaning, in botanist's Latin, the flower-stalk of a flower growing out of a cluster of leaves on the ground. It is a bad corruption of 'sceptre,' and especially false and absurd, because a true sceptre is necessarily branched.[15] In 'Proserpina,' when ...
— Proserpina, Volume 2 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... charge of the vessel. You ought to know a dozen such. I will wait eighteen months to give you time to make all arrangements." The eighteen months had now nearly passed over, and the time for the desperate attempt drew near. Faithful to his cruel philosophy, John Rex had provided scape-goats, who, by their vicarious agonies, should assist ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... nor anudder; it is a wicked nigger! A wicked wite man's bad snuff, dur Lord nose! but dey so dam wite, an so kussed sarcy, day doun no no better, so dar's some appolleragee fur 'em; but I gin yer for th noe as how, a wicked nigger can nibber scape frum de vengence ob de Lord-day's no use playin possum any more dan day was ob Joner coorin it into de wale's belly! (Glory from the congregation) Let um go to de Norf Pole, or to de Souf Pole, to de West Pole, or to de East Pole, or de Poles in any ob de words; he ant a bit safer den he would ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - Kentucky Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... time, give me the management And manufacture of a model me, Me fifty-fold, a prince without a flaw,— Why, there's no social grade, the sordidest, My embryo potentate should brink and scape. King, all the better he was cobbler once, He should know, sitting on the throne, how tastes Life to who ...
— Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher • Henry Jones

... we'll see about that. I'll send over there and have everything put to rights. No, I'll send the carriage and have them brought home. I'll be—I say I won't be made a scape-goat of in this ...
— An Arkansas Planter • Opie Percival Read

... though thou wert mine enemy, And vayne ambition mou'd vs to this strife; Yet now in death when strife and enuy cease. Thy princely vertues and thy noble minde, Moue me to rue thy vndeserued death, That found a greater daunger then it fled; 810 Vnhapy man to scape so many wars, And to protract thy glorious day so long, Here for to perish in a barbarous soyle, And end liues date stabd by a Bastards hand, But yet with honour shalt thou be Intomb'd, I will enbalme thy body with my teares, And put thy ashes ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... that tea scape, and the quarrels with the red-coat troops in Boston, the people of Massachusetts, and, in fact, of nearly all New England, began to see that there was no way of upholding their rights but by war, and they accordingly ...
— The Yankee Tea-party - Or, Boston in 1773 • Henry C. Watson

... adverse verdict, George I. persisted in showing favor to the disgraced Chancellor; and when the violent emotions of the crisis had passed away it was generally admitted by enlightened critics of public events that Lord Macclesfield had been unfairly treated. The scape-goat of popular wrath, he suffered less for his own faults, than for the evil results of a bad system; and at the present time—when the silence of more than a hundred and thirty years rests upon his tomb—Englishmen, with one voice, acknowledge the valuable qualities ...
— A Book About Lawyers • John Cordy Jeaffreson

... across, borne in close heads, having stalks over an inch long springing from stout scapes; the six long oval petals are of a shining yellow colour; the seed organs also are all yellow and half the length of petals; the scape is about a foot high, naked, round, and very stout; the leaves are nearly as broad as tulip leaves, and otherwise much ...
— Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers - Describing the Most Desirable Plants, for Borders, - Rockeries, and Shrubberies. • John Wood

... cannot 'scape me, 'tis impossible he should; he cannot creep into a halfpenny purse or ...
— The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare • Henry Nicholson Ellacombe

... inhabited by over 100,000 natives, black cannibals of the ugliest description; but at this day not a hundred of them remain. The natives were exceeding stupid and useless; the first settlers, who, as Capt. Rocksalt observes, were jail-birds and scape-gallows, were not very dainty in dealing with the obnoxious natives; so they determined to get rid of them as fast and easy as possible. For this purpose, they used to gather a horde of them together, and give them poisoned bread and rum, ...
— The Humors of Falconbridge - A Collection of Humorous and Every Day Scenes • Jonathan F. Kelley

... If we 'scape from our troubles to take a short nap, We awake with a din about limestone and trap; And the fire is extinguished past regeneration, For the women were wrapt in ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 12, - Issue 326, August 9, 1828 • Various

... have been of some interest at an earlier period, but was of no service as matters stood, except so far as it assisted in removing from Mr. Bilkins's mind a passing doubt as to whether the Larry O'Rourke of the telegraphic reports was Margaret's scape-grace of a husband. Mr. Donnehugh had known all along that O'Rourke had absconded to Boston by a night train and enlisted in the navy. It was the possession of this knowledge that had made it impossible for Mr. Donnehugh to look at ...
— A Rivermouth Romance • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... my reasons, but I don't mind telling 'em to you. In the first place, three or four fellers made their 'scape from the 'Cricket' afore the fighting began, and it's quite likely that my company vill be desired by the gents, on the ground that I vos the one vot betrayed 'em. I know that you will consider it strange that such an idea should exist, and any one wid half ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... narrow escape. My honest fellows took me to my uncle at Wearmouth, and he shipped me off with the good folk here, and cares for my maintenance. How didst thou 'scape?" ...
— Grisly Grisell • Charlotte M. Yonge

... accessions to the population of San Francisco all three classes of criminals are represented, and in no stinted numbers. There are ticket-of-leave men from Australia, jail-birds from the penitentiaries of the States, 'scape-the-gallows customers from every quarter of the globe; to say nothing of the native bandits, of which California has its share. If known to these that yellow metal, to the value of three hundred thousand ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... little stem of their own, called a scape, that springs up separately from the root. But usually the main stem or one of the branches is changed into a flower-stem. Now suppose we cut this rose-bud in two, and then I can ...
— Harper's Young People, June 29, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... barking up the tree at last. I jedge he's got them coons separated from ther hook in the swamp, an' if that's so they ain't agoin' to 'scape him this time," remarked George, as ...
— The House Boat Boys • St. George Rathborne

... stringently applied.[162] By this stand the Professor places himself in sweet accord with the re-actionists of all shades, who otherwise are mortally opposed to him. Haeckel is of the opinion that incorrigible scape-graces must be uprooted like weeds that take from plants light, air and space. Had Haeckel turned his mind slightly toward social, instead of engaging it wholly with natural science, he would know that these criminals could, in most instances, ...
— Woman under socialism • August Bebel

... well-timed that this ideal aristocratic connection. Jack was a good fellow, a dear boy; and he added to his apparent amiabilities now by reiterating counsels of kindness and silence towards "poor dear sister Maria, whom he had been making the scape-goat all this time;" after which done, our stock-jobber feigned a pressing engagement with some fashionable friends, and left his father to ruminate upon his ...
— The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper • Martin Farquhar Tupper



Words linked to "Scape" :   flower stalk, stalk, architecture, stem, vertical, shaft, peduncle



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